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Suppose a structure defined as below is allocated dynamically in an array. Would the type, label and description need to null terminated in order to safely delete the allocated structures?

struct operation_data
{
    int number;             
    char* type;             
    char* label;                
    char* description;
}

operation *data=new operation_data[5];  
for (int i=0; i<5; i++)
{
    data[i].type=new char[250];
    data[i].label=new char[250];
    data[i].description=new char[250];
}    
for (int i=0; i<5; i++)
{
    if (data[i].type) delete[] data[i].type;
    if (data[i].label) delete[] data[i].label;
    if (data[i].description) delete[] data[i].description;    
}

My code represents the snippet above. this is causing a Heap corruption detected error in the second delete statement. Please help me rectify this.

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2  
If you must use C-style strings (char *) then add a destructor that explicitly calls delete[] if you called new[] or free if they were malloced. –  Mike Bantegui Jul 5 '12 at 15:22
    
Can you please show a proper way to initialize and free the structure using arrays of operation. I am having leaks if I only free the parent array. –  TrustyCoder Jul 5 '12 at 16:18
    
@nitroxn There should be a delete [] data; at the end. –  olchauvin Jul 5 '12 at 18:35

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

no, they dont need to be null terminated. null termination is only an indicator where the string inside the char array ends.

i would recommend to add a ctor and dtor to your struct to safely delete it.

struct operation {
  int number;
  char* type;
  char* label;
  char* description;

  operation() : type(0), label(0), description(0) {}
  ~operation() {
    if( type )
          delete[] type;
    if( label )
      delete[] label;
    if( description )
      delete[] description;
  }
};
share|improve this answer
    
The structure is to be used again and again in a singleton scenario where destructor may not be called during the entire program execution. –  TrustyCoder Jul 5 '12 at 16:29
    
Is this correct if( type ) delete[] type; if( label ) delete[] type; if( description ) delete[] type; –  TrustyCoder Jul 5 '12 at 16:32
    
@nitroxn sry, copypasta error –  cygenb0ck Jul 11 '12 at 9:39

If they really are arrays, then they must have been created with new[].

In that case, you must delete them with delete[], this should deallocate the array correctly.

So, you should have somewhere:

char* description = new [someSize];

and to delete it, you should do:

delete [] description;

Also, if you are using c++, you can use std::string instead of char*. That way, when the string is destroyed, the underlying memory is automatically freed.

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would you delete individual members of the struct or just the array of the struct itself. –  TrustyCoder Jul 5 '12 at 16:24
1  
@nitroxn If the individual members have been create with new, you will have to delete them first, then delete[] the list. Maybe this should help you: stackoverflow.com/questions/2486034/delete-an-array-of-objects. I think that in your case you should use std::string instead of char*. –  olchauvin Jul 5 '12 at 16:42

No. When you delete the structure, you are only deleting the ~16 bytes of memory for the structure itself (one int and three pointers). You are not actually deleting the memory that the pointers are pointing to. You must do that separately and it does not require null termination.

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No, null-termination is not necessary to delete an array. If they were allocated with new char[size], then they can be deleted with delete [], whatever their contents.

If they have been allocated, then you'll need to delete each of them before deleting the struct itself; member pointers are not automatically deleted.

Null termination is necessary to use them with functions such as those in the C library that work with null-terminated strings. In C++, it's usually more convenient to use the standard std::string class, which manages the memory allocation for you.

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The type, label and description need not to be null terminated

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1  
What you've written means that type must not be null terminated, rather than there is no requirement that type be null terminated. I suspect this is an English issue rather than an understanding one. –  Philip Kendall Jul 5 '12 at 15:22
    
Oh, ha ha, my English is really not very good... –  Fei Jiang Oct 27 '12 at 18:13

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