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Is it possible to find which method was called on an object without having it in body of the object?

I mean :

 function foo() {
   if(! (this instanceof foo) ) return new foo();
   alert(this.find_which_method_was_called()); // output 'myMethod'
 }

 foo().myMethod();
share|improve this question
4  
myMethod() is called after the foo() constructor returns, so there is no chance you could know if it's called or not in the constructor. – arnaud576875 Jul 5 '12 at 15:26
    
This might help: gettingclever.com/2008/06/javascript-stacktrace.html – ControlAltDel Jul 5 '12 at 15:27
up vote 4 down vote accepted

myMethod() is called after the foo() constructor returns, so there is no chance you could know if it's called or not in the constructor.

You could, however, wrap your object in a proxy and save the name of all called functions in an array:

function Proxy(object) {

    this.calledFunctions = [];

    for (var name in object) {
        if (typeof object[name] != 'function') {
            continue;
        }
        this[name] = (function (name, fun) {
            return function() {
                this.calledFunctions.push(name);
                return fun.apply(object, arguments);
            };
        }(name, object[name]));
    }
}

Now you can do this:

var f = new Proxy(new foo());
f.myMethod();
alert(f.calledFunctions);
share|improve this answer
    
+1 I wouldn't use this but that's pretty. – Denys Séguret Jul 5 '12 at 15:40
    
thanks, but is it possible to use Proxy without "new Proxy(new foo());" ? – John Jul 5 '12 at 15:54
    
in foo(), try returning new Proxy(this) at the end of the constructor. – arnaud576875 Jul 5 '12 at 15:57

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