Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I need to create a class with two properties:

  1. LogOutput
  2. ExceptionOutput

These properties (Actions<>) send a message or a exception depending on the target function. This target function is set via properties.

Currently, I have this functional code:

    public class Output
    {
        private Action<string> logOutput;
        private Action<Exception, string> exceptionOutput;

        public Action<string> LogOutput { set { this.logOutput = value; } get { return this.logOutput; } }
        public Action<Exception, string> ExceptionOutput { set { this.exceptionOutput = value; } get { return this.exceptionOutput; } }

        public Output() : this(null, null) { }

        public Output(Action<string> logAction, Action<Exception, string> exceptionAction) 
        {
            this.logOutput = logAction;
            this.exceptionOutput = exceptionAction;
        }


        public void WriteLogMessage(string format, params object[] args) 
        {
            if (this.logOutput != null)
                logOutput(string.Format(format, args));
        }

        public void WriteExceptionMessage(Exception ex, string format, params object[] args) 
        {
            if (this.exceptionOutput != null)
                exceptionOutput(ex, string.Format(format, args));
        }
    }

And this is my form code:

    private void MainForm_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        // my Output object
        Output myOutput = new Output();

        // set properties
        myOutput.ExceptionOutput = this.WriteExceptionMessageToTextBox;
        myOutput.LogOutput = this.WriteLogMessageToTextBox;

        // test
        myOutput.WriteLogMessage("this is my log message to text box");
        myOutput.WriteExceptionMessage(new Exception("this is my exception"), "this is my exception message to text box");
    }

    private void WriteLogMessageToTextBox(string message)
    {
        // nothing to do here
        if (this.txtBox.IsDisposed)
            return;

        if (this.InvokeRequired)
        {
            BeginInvoke(new MethodInvoker(delegate() { WriteLogMessageToTextBox(message); }));
        }
        else 
        {
            // write to text box
            this.txtBox.AppendText(message + Environment.NewLine);
        }
    }

    private void WriteExceptionMessageToTextBox(Exception ex, string message)
    {
        // nothing to do here
        if (this.txtBox.IsDisposed)
            return;

        if (this.InvokeRequired)
        {
            BeginInvoke(new MethodInvoker(delegate() { WriteExceptionMessageToTextBox(ex, message); }));
        }
        else
        {
            string msg = "";
            msg += string.Format("Program:{0}", message);
            msg += string.Format("Message{0}", ex.Message);
            msg += string.Format("StackTrace:{0}", ex.StackTrace);
            msg += string.Format("Source:{0}", ex.Source);

            // write to text box
            this.txtBox.AppendText(msg + Environment.NewLine);
        }
    }

It is correct this model? There is another way to do this?

share|improve this question
    
If "myOutput.ExceptionOutput = null" is acceptable then events and delegates aren't different. Events are "correct" so delegates are too. –  Adriano Repetti Jul 5 '12 at 15:42
1  
Is it working? If so this might be better suited to CodeReview. –  C. Ross Jul 5 '12 at 15:43

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

It is correct this model? There is another way to do this?

There is nothing wrong with this, necessarily. However, events may be a more common approach to handling this, as you're effectively using the delegate as an event in this scenario.

Using events does have one significant advantage (potentially), in that you can also easily have multiple subscribers, which would make it simple to allow more than one item to "listen" to the exceptions or log messages. (*While this works with delegates as well, it wouldn't be as standard of a way to use delegates..)

share|improve this answer

sorry offtopic but use StringBuilder string is not prefer for editing

            string msg = "";
            msg += string.Format("Program:{0}", message);
            msg += string.Format("Message{0}", ex.Message);
            msg += string.Format("StackTrace:{0}", ex.StackTrace);
            msg += string.Format("Source:{0}", ex.Source);


            StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
            sb.Append(string.Format("Program:{0}", message));
            sb.Append(string.Format("Message{0}", ex.Message));
            sb.Append(string.Format("StackTrace:{0}", ex.StackTrace));
            sb.Append(string.Format("Source:{0}", ex.Source));
            string result = sb.ToString();
share|improve this answer
    
You could change .Append() => .AppendFormat(), and chain them as well. –  Chris Gessler Jul 5 '12 at 15:52
1  
Given that the string isn't likely to be that large, and that there are only four concatenations this isn't likely to be a significant problem. This also doesn't actually answer the question in any way, it's just a comment. –  Servy Jul 5 '12 at 15:53
    
comment has poor view place –  burning_LEGION Jul 5 '12 at 16:04

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.