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How can I achieve this behavior?

class A
{
    int x;
public:
    A(int x) : x(x) {}
};

class B
{
    A a; // here is the problem
public:
    B() : a(1) {} // solution i found
};

int main(void)
{
    B b;
    return 0;
}

I'm wondering if there is another way of making this work except the answer I found.

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1  
Note: a constructor that can accept a single parameter is usually better marked explicit. –  Matthieu M. Jul 5 '12 at 17:26

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

No. That's the proper solution. You explicitly state you don't want it to be possible to initialize A with no parameters, so this outcome shouldn't surprise you.

Or provide a default for x:

class A
{
    int x;
public:
    A(int x = 1) : x(x) {}
};

making it a default constructor.

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Add a second, default constructor to A:

class A
{
    int x;
public:
    A(int x) : x(x) {}
    A() : x(1) {}
};
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Yes, in C++11, you could just write this:

class B
{
    A a(1); //C++11 support this! (though the compilers may not, now)
public:
    B() {} //nothing here!
};

Or this,

    A a{1}; //using uniform initialization
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You should remember that when you add one constructor explicitly then default constructor will be not created automaticly. It is a only a default constructor. Copy constructor will be created.

Also remember of rule of three:

The rule of three (also known as the Law of The Big Three or The Big Three) is a rule of thumb in C++ that claims that if a class defines one of the following it should probably explicitly define all three[1]:

destructor
copy constructor
copy assignment operator

>

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I'm sure you already know this but you can make "a" a pointer to an object of type A: that will allow you to control when the object is instantiated, and thus what value can be passed into the A constructor at run time (will require deletion obviously)

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