Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Imagine that I have a question for which there are four options, and a respondent can select zero or any combination of the four. The variables are named A, B, C, and D and the responses are stored in a data.frame as below.

set.seed(1)
dat = data.frame(A = sample(c(0, 1), 20, replace=TRUE), 
                 B = sample(c(0, 1), 20, replace=TRUE), 
                 C = sample(c(0, 1), 20, replace=TRUE),
                 D = sample(c(0, 1), 20, replace=TRUE))

I can tabulate the combination of responses (for example, how many responded with A alone, or A+B, or C+D, and so on) by doing the following:

data.frame(table(dat))
#    A B C D Freq
# 1  0 0 0 0    2
# 2  1 0 0 0    2
# 3  0 1 0 0    0
# 4  1 1 0 0    1
# 5  0 0 1 0    1
# 6  1 0 1 0    3
# 7  0 1 1 0    0
# 8  1 1 1 0    2
# 9  0 0 0 1    0
# 10 1 0 0 1    2
# 11 0 1 0 1    1
# 12 1 1 0 1    1
# 13 0 0 1 1    2
# 14 1 0 1 1    0
# 15 0 1 1 1    3
# 16 1 1 1 1    0

I would like to now create a new column that shows the letter combination that is being represented by this output. For example, row 4 represents the count of A+B responses, and row 14 represents the count of A+C+D responses.

I think that one of the apply functions would be useful here, but I'm not sure how to proceed.

share|improve this question
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 3 down vote accepted
dat.t <- data.frame(table(dat))    
dat.t$combn <- apply(dat.t[,1:4] == 1, 1, function(x) paste(names(dat)[x], collapse=' + '))

> dat.t
   A B C D Freq         combn
1  0 0 0 0    2              
2  1 0 0 0    2             A
3  0 1 0 0    0             B
4  1 1 0 0    1         A + B
5  0 0 1 0    1             C
6  1 0 1 0    3         A + C
7  0 1 1 0    0         B + C
8  1 1 1 0    2     A + B + C
9  0 0 0 1    0             D
10 1 0 0 1    2         A + D
11 0 1 0 1    1         B + D
12 1 1 0 1    1     A + B + D
13 0 0 1 1    2         C + D
14 1 0 1 1    0     A + C + D
15 0 1 1 1    3     B + C + D
16 1 1 1 1    0 A + B + C + D
> 
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. That works perfectly. I still stumble a lot applying custom functions within apply. –  Ananda Mahto Jul 5 '12 at 16:30
    
@mrdwab my technique is to start with a single row or column depending on the application and create a function that does what I want. Then the extension to apply is straight forward. The same is true for lapply. If you have a function that works on a single item, lapply over a list of similar items will give the desired results. –  Justin Jul 5 '12 at 16:31
    
(+1) Nice solution. –  chl Jul 5 '12 at 17:02
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.