Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a repository implemented using LINQ to SQL. I need to do Unit Testing though I don't have a database. How can I write the UT for FreezeAllAccountsForUser method? Can you please show an example using manually mocking?

Note: There is inheritance mapping used in domain objects

Note: Unit Testing is to be done using Visual Studio Team Test

Comment from @StuperUser. Unit testing involves completely isolating code from the other objects it interacts with. This means that if the code fails, you can be sure that the failure is to do with the code under test. To do this you have to fake these objects.

CODE

     public void FreezeAllAccountsForUser(int userId)
    {
        List<DTOLayer.BankAccountDTOForStatus> bankAccountDTOList = new List<DTOLayer.BankAccountDTOForStatus>(); 

        IEnumerable<DBML_Project.BankAccount> accounts = AccountRepository.GetAllAccountsForUser(userId);
        foreach (DBML_Project.BankAccount acc in accounts)
        {
            string typeResult = Convert.ToString(acc.GetType());
            string baseValue = Convert.ToString(typeof(DBML_Project.BankAccount));

            if (String.Equals(typeResult, baseValue))
            {
                throw new Exception("Not correct derived type");
            }

            acc.Freeze();

            DTOLayer.BankAccountDTOForStatus presentAccount = new DTOLayer.BankAccountDTOForStatus();
            presentAccount.BankAccountID = acc.BankAccountID;
            presentAccount.Status = acc.Status;
            bankAccountDTOList.Add(presentAccount);

        }



        IEnumerable<System.Xml.Linq.XElement> el = bankAccountDTOList.Select(x =>
                        new System.Xml.Linq.XElement("BankAccountDTOForStatus",
                          new System.Xml.Linq.XElement("BankAccountID", x.BankAccountID),
                          new System.Xml.Linq.XElement("Status", x.Status)
                        ));

        System.Xml.Linq.XElement root = new System.Xml.Linq.XElement("root", el);


        //AccountRepository.UpdateBankAccountUsingParseXML_SP(root);
        AccountRepository.Update();

    }

Repository Layer

namespace RepositoryLayer
{
public interface ILijosBankRepository
{
    System.Data.Linq.DataContext Context { get; set; }
    List<DBML_Project.BankAccount> GetAllAccountsForUser(int userID);
    void Update();

}

public class LijosSimpleBankRepository : ILijosBankRepository
{
    public System.Data.Linq.DataContext Context
    {
        get;
        set;
    }


    public List<DBML_Project.BankAccount> GetAllAccountsForUser(int userID)
    {
        IQueryable<DBML_Project.BankAccount> queryResultEntities = Context.GetTable<DBML_Project.BankAccount>().Where(p => p.AccountOwnerID == userID);
        return queryResultEntities.ToList();
    }


    public virtual void Update()
    {
        //Context.SubmitChanges();
    }

}

}

Domain Classes

namespace DBML_Project
{

public  partial class BankAccount
{
    //Define the domain behaviors
    public virtual void Freeze()
    {
        //Do nothing
    }
}

public class FixedBankAccount : BankAccount
{

    public override void Freeze()
    {
        this.Status = "FrozenFA";
    }
}

public class SavingsBankAccount : BankAccount
{

    public override void Freeze()
    {
        this.Status = "FrozenSB";
    }
}  
}

Auto generated Class by LINQ to SQL

[global::System.Data.Linq.Mapping.TableAttribute(Name="dbo.BankAccount")]
[InheritanceMapping(Code = "Fixed", Type = typeof(FixedBankAccount), IsDefault = true)]
[InheritanceMapping(Code = "Savings", Type = typeof(SavingsBankAccount))]
public partial class BankAccount : INotifyPropertyChanging, INotifyPropertyChanged
share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The Repository responsibility is to persist domain objects and fetch them on request. i.e. it's job is to take an object and deserialize/serialize it to from some form of durable storage.

So tests for the repository have to test against the real storage in this case a DB. i.e. these are integration tests - tests that your class integrates with the external DB.

Once you have this nailed, the rest of the client/app doesn't have to work against the real DB. They can mock the repository and have fast unit tests. You can assume that GetAccount works since the integration tests pass.

More details: By passing in the Repository object as a ctor or method arg, you open the doors for passing in a fake or a mock. Thus now the service tests can run without a real repository >> there is no DB-access >> fast tests.

public void FreezeAllAccountsForUser(int userId, ILijosBankRepository accountRepository)
{
  // your code as before
}

test ()
{  var mockRepository = new Mock<ILijosBankRepository>();
    var service = // create object containing FreezeAllAccounts...

    service.FreezeAllAccounts(SOME_USER_ID, mockRepository);

    mock.Verify(r => r.GetAllAccountsForUser(SOME_USER_ID);
    mock.Verify(r => r.Update());
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. "They can mock the repository and have fast unit tests." Can you please explain how those Unit Tests will look like? –  Lijo Jul 6 '12 at 8:56
    
Can you please explain how to test FreezeAllAccountsForUser method which is not a repository method? –  Lijo Jul 6 '12 at 9:11
    
Thanks. Which is the mock tool used for it? –  Lijo Jul 6 '12 at 15:13
    
The tool itself doesn't matter.. most of them are similar. I think the syntax I've used is Moq-ish.. may not compile. –  Gishu Jul 6 '12 at 18:18
add comment

Simply, you can't. The sole purpose of the repository implementation is talking to the database. So the database technology does matter and you should perform integration tests.

Unit testing this code is impossible because LINQ to Objects is a superset of LINQ to SQL. You might have a green unit test and still get the runtime exception when using real db because you used a feature of LINQ in your repository that cannot be translated into SQL.

share|improve this answer
    
But the following posts says such an approach. What do you think? stackoverflow.com/questions/7076726/… Also see stackoverflow.com/questions/4649786/… –  Lijo Jul 6 '12 at 5:53
    
Imagine a simple example: You created a custom property in your entity that is not mapped to table cell but computed somehow. The repository methot that uses that property in where clause will pass the unit test and fail in integration test. –  Bartłomiej Szypelow Jul 6 '12 at 8:28
1  
What's the point of writing unit tests that give false positives? –  Bartłomiej Szypelow Jul 6 '12 at 8:56
    
You can create a mock of the repository that returns a list of in memory objects and validating if the Update command receives proper parameter value. –  Bartłomiej Szypelow Jul 6 '12 at 9:26
2  
Check out Moq, Rhino Mocks, FakeItEasy. And you can always create a mock manually. Those mocking frameworks make the task just less verbose. –  Bartłomiej Szypelow Jul 6 '12 at 9:30
show 1 more comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.