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I have a directory tree like this:

├── dir_a
│   └── file_1.txt
├── dir_b
│   └── dir_c
│       ├── file_2.txt
|       └── file_3.txt
└── file_4.txt

I want to mirror this directory structure to hold the results of a command that processes each text file. I.e., the output would look like this:

├── build
│   ├── dir_a
│   │   └── processed_file_1.txt
│   ├── dir_b
│   │   └── dir_c
│   │       ├── processed_file_2.txt
│   |       └── processed_file_3.txt
│   └── processed_file_4.txt
├── dir_a
│   └── file_1.txt
├── dir_b
│   └── dir_c
│       ├── file_2.txt
|       └── file_3.txt
└── file_4.txt

I'm not very adept with Makefiles, so my question is: how can I get a Makefile to recreate the directory structure and recursively process all text files to place them into the right place inside the build directory? I'll be running this repeatedly as the input files change, so a Makefile that doesn't process unchanged files seems like the right way to go.

Update: I should also mention that new input files will be added frequently, so I don't want the Makefile to name them explicitly.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It would be easier if you used stems with different suffixes rather than inserting that "processed_" string, but here's an example that works for me here:

OUTPUTS := build/dir_a/processed_file_1.txt       \
           build/dir_b/dir_c/processed_file_2.txt \
           build/dir_b/dir_c/processed_file_3.txt \
           build/processed_file_4.txt

all: $(OUTPUTS)

.SECONDEXPANSION:
$(OUTPUTS): build/% : $$(subst processed_file_,file_,%)
    mkdir -p $(dir $@)
    cp $< $@

clean:
    rm -rf build

You could remove the complication of .SECONDEXPANSION by changing the end of the filename instead of the beginning:

OUTPUTS := build/dir_a/file_1.out       \
           build/dir_b/dir_c/file_2.out \
           build/dir_b/dir_c/file_3.out \
           build/file_4.out

all: $(OUTPUTS)

$(OUTPUTS) : build/%.out : %.txt
    mkdir -p $(dir $@)
    cp $< $@

clean:
    rm -rf build
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That looks great, but is there a way to avoid specifying the list of files explicitly in the OUTPUTS variable? Many more files will be added and I'd rather not update the Makefile every time. Thanks for the response. –  Marco Jul 5 '12 at 18:23
1  
Sure, you can generate the list of outputs. Something along the lines of INPUTS := $(shell find . -name '*.txt'), and then manipulate that via subset or patsubst, perhaps? –  Carl Norum Jul 5 '12 at 18:24
    
Autocorrect got me - I meant subst or patsubst. –  Carl Norum Jul 5 '12 at 18:33
    
Works like a charm. Thanks, Carl. –  Marco Jul 5 '12 at 18:38

As Carl suggested, you could use secondary expansion, but in conjunction with order-only prerequisites.

BUILD_DIR = build

IN_FILES := dir_a/file_1.out       \
            dir_b/dir_c/file_2.out \
            dir_b/dir_c/file_3.out \
            file_4.out

OUT_FILES := $(IN_FILES:%=$(BUILD_DIR)/%)

all: $(OUT_FILES)

.SECONDEXPANSION:
$(OUT_FILES) : $(BUILD_DIR)/%.out : %.txt | $$(@D)/.
    # your text processing rule here...

%/. :
    mkdir -p $*

| $$(@D) means:

  • during the secondary expansion calculate the value of $(@D) automatic variable (which is the directory part of the target), and
  • add the order-only dependency on it, that is ensure that the directory exists, but don't consider remaking the target if it is older than the directory (which is an often case)
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