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I have a variable length list of person models that I use @Html.EditorFor to generate a form for.

public class Person
{
    public string First { get; set; }
    public string Last { get; set; }
}

What would be the best way to validate that no person objects have the same first and last name?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The following is a minimal implementation of validating that no 2 items in a Person collection are the same:

public class NoDuplicatePersonsAttribute : ValidationAttribute
{
    public override bool IsValid(object value)
    {
        var people = value as IList<Person>;
        int count = people.Count();

        if (people == null) return true;

        for (int x = 0; x < count; x++)
        {
            for (int y = 0; y < count; y++)
            {
                if (x != y &&
                    people[x].FirstName == people[y].FirstName &&
                    people[x].LastName == people[y].LastName) 
                        return false;
            }
        }

        return true;
    }
}

public class IndexViewModel
{
    [NoDuplicatePersons]
    public IList<Person> People { get; set; }
}


public class Person
{
    public string FirstName{ get; set; }
    public string LastName { get; set; }
}
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1  
Thanks. I didn't think about putting the attribute on the collection. –  user654616 Jul 5 '12 at 19:30

I would create a unique constraint on the table and intercept DB Exception in Person insert if possible.

But you could also create a validation attribute to check for existing first/ last name combos.

This psuedocode example does not account for checking for First Name/Last Name combo, but rather just looks at one field NAME, as an example of Custom Validation per your question.

Create custom validation attribute:

public class NameAttribute : ValidationAttribute, IClientValidatable
{
    //Validate logic
}

In model, use the custom validation attribute and include error message:

public class Person
{   

    [Required]
    [Name (ErrorMessage = "This name already exists.")]   
    [Display(Name = "Name")]
    public string Name { get; set; }   

}

View:

    <div class="editor-field">
          @Html.TextBoxFor(m => m.Name)
          @Html.ValidationMessageFor(m => m. Name)
    </div>
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1  
Who said anything about SQL? But I agree that if a relational database is used, this is indeed a good approach. –  Darin Dimitrov Jul 5 '12 at 17:33
    
Right @Darin Dimitrov, added alternative (was actually doing that when you posted this). –  user1166147 Jul 5 '12 at 17:41
    
But in the alternative you talk about querying a database. Remember that the record is not yet stored. It's the user filling a form. –  Darin Dimitrov Jul 5 '12 at 17:49
    
Right, I get that it isn't stored yet- but they have to check for duplicates stored somewhere to ensure uniqueness, wherever that is. Changed text to not say check for existing first/ last name combos in DB. Thanks –  user1166147 Jul 5 '12 at 18:21

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