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I'm working on a WinJS Windows Metro application and on one of my pages I'm getting a URL to an image to display as a background. I can get that working just fine by using url(the URL of the image) and setting that as the style.backgroundImage.

I need to use that same image on a linked page, but that means I have to make another HTTP request, which I'm trying to avoid. I looked into alternatives and found LocalFolder as an option. The only issue is I don't know how to access the file and set it as a background.

Is that the right way to go about caching data to reduce webcalls?

Here's the code I'm using:

function saveBackground(url) {
    localFolder.createFileAsync("background.jpg", Windows.Storage.CreationCollisionOption.replaceExisting).then(function (newFile) {
        var uri = Windows.Foundation.Uri(url);
        var downloader = new Windows.Networking.BackgroundTransfer.BackgroundDownloader();
        var promise = downloader.createDownload(uri, newFile);
        promise.startAsync().then(function () {
            //set background here.
            var wrapper = document.getElementById("wrapper").style;
            localFolder.getFileAsync("background.jpg").then(function (image) {

                console.log(image.path);
                var path = image.path.split("");
                var newLocation = [];
                //This is just to make the backslashes work out for the url()
                for (var i = 0; i < path.length; i++) {
                    if (path[i] != '\\') {
                        newLocation.push(path[i]);
                    } else {
                        newLocation.push('\\\\');
                    }
                }
                console.log(newLocation);
                var newPath = newLocation.join("");
                var target = "url(" + newPath + ")";
                wrapper.backgroundImage = target;
                console.log(wrapper.backgroundImage);
                wrapper.backgroundSize = "cover";

            });
        });
    });
}
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1 Answer 1

It depends on which kind of image you want to transfer and how many of these. If there is only one image and not an heavy one (<5Mo approximately) I suggest you to use WinJS.xhr which allows you to download datas and more important it downloads the data as soon as its called.

The BackgroundTransfer should be used for big datas such as videos, musics, large images.

Concerning the caching of your image yes you can do it of course with the local folder (and you should do it this way).

You should take a look to this series of article made by David Catuhe which are really great

http://blogs.msdn.com/b/eternalcoding/archive/2012/06/15/how-to-cook-a-complete-windows-8-application-with-html5-css3-and-javascript-in-a-week-day-0.aspx

Hope this help.

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