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I know that the way the names are in the HtmlHelper is what is breaking the model binding. But I haven't figured out how to fix it. Or if there is even a fix.

A little explanation. I'm using one model to populate the: text, controls, default values (select lists), and values saved. I'm using the other ViewModel to only return the: value, dataid, and ctrltypeid. What has been commented out is the code (ex: Html.TextBoxFor) that is causing the postback ViewModel to be unpopulated. The working code (ex: Html.TextBox) does as expected. So I'm wondering what do I have to do to the commented code to make it work like the uncommented code. Is there actually anything I can do?

@model InspectionWebFormsMVC.ViewModels.FormRowModel

@using (Html.BeginForm("Index", "Section", FormMethod.Post))
    {

            <div style="clear:both; padding:1%;">       
                <div class="section">
                    @Model.Section
                </div>
                <div class="number">
                    @Model.SectionNumber
                </div>
                <div class="desc">
                    @Model.Description
                </div>
                <div class="ctrl">               
            @{
        int i = 0;
        //for (int i = 0; i < formRow.RowInput.Count; ++i)
        foreach (var RowInput in Model.RowInput)
        {
            var ddv = new SelectList(RowInput.RowCtrl.DefaultValues, "Value", "Label");
            switch (RowInput.RowCtrl.Type)
            {
                case "dropdown":
                    //@Html.DropDownListFor(blah => RowInput.InputtedData, ddv)
                    //@Html.HiddenFor(blah => RowInput.InputtedDataID)
                    //@Html.HiddenFor(blah => RowInput.RowCtrl.CtrlTypeID)

                                   @Html.DropDownList("InputtedData", ddv)                                   
                                   @Html.Hidden("InputtedDataID", RowInput.InputtedDataID)
                                   @Html.Hidden("CtrlTypeID", RowInput.RowCtrl.CtrlTypeID)
                                   <br /> 
                              break;
                case "text":
                                   //@Html.TextBoxFor(blah => RowInput.InputtedData)
                                   //@Html.HiddenFor(blah => RowInput.InputtedDataID)
                                   //@Html.HiddenFor(blah => RowInput.RowCtrl.CtrlTypeID)

                                   @Html.TextBox("InputtedData", RowInput.InputtedData)
                                   @Html.Hidden("InputtedDataID", RowInput.InputtedDataID)
                                   @Html.Hidden("CtrlTypeID", RowInput.RowCtrl.CtrlTypeID)   
                                   <br /> 
                              break;
            }
        }
        ++i;
                    }

Obviously Viewmodel for the Postback.

namespace InspectionWebFormsMVC.ViewModels
{
    public class SaveKeyValueInput
    {
        public long InputtedDataID { get; set; }
        public long CtrlTypeID { get; set; }
        public string InputtedData { get; set; }
    }
}

From Controller. Used for testing.

[HttpPost]
    public ActionResult Index(SaveKeyValueInput placeholder)
    {
        var ha = placeholder;
        var la = "Hello";

        FormRowProcessing placeholder2 = new FormRowProcessing();
        var stub = placeholder2.stub()[2];
        return View(stub);
    }
share|improve this question
    
Unrelated word of advice... I would recommend following MSDN casing conventions, which include that variable names should be camel cased e.g. var rowInput rather than var RowInput –  Eric J. Jul 5 '12 at 17:52

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Here's how to make the commented code work:

for (int i = 0; i < Model.RowInput.Count; i++)
{
    @Html.DropDownListFor(blah => blah.RowInputpi[i].InputtedData, ddv)
    @Html.HiddenFor(blah => blah.RowInput[i].InputtedDataID)
    @Html.HiddenFor(blah => blah.RowInput[i].RowCtrl.CtrlTypeID)
    ...
}

or a much better way is to of course completely get rid of this ugly loop (for or foreach) and replace it with a single line of code:

@Html.EditorFor(x => x.RowInput)

Now all that's left for you is to define the corresponding editor template (which will automatically be rendered by the framework for each element of the RowInput collection so that you don't have to write any loops). Editor templates work by convention. So if your RowInput property is defined like this:

public IEnumerable<FooBar> RowInput { get; set; }

you define the template ~/Views/Shared/EditorTemplates/FooBar.cshtml:

@model FooBar

... put your switches and cases and stuff, but I remove this noise to 
... make the answer more readable

@Html.DropDownListFor(blah => blah.InputtedData, ddv)
@Html.HiddenFor(blah => blah.InputtedDataID)
@Html.HiddenFor(blah => blah.RowCtrl.CtrlTypeID)

But since your form contains all the records the corresponding controller action that you are posting to must work with the top level view model because you are sending everything:

[HttpPost]
public ActionResult Index(FormRowModel model)
{
    ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
Even if only there are 3 input fields? Everything else will be text and will come back empty, 0, or null. –  dotnetN00b Jul 5 '12 at 18:13
    
Probably you haven't respected the correct naming convention. –  Darin Dimitrov Jul 5 '12 at 19:04
    
I ran into a problem. I guess I'll make another post about it. But the long and short of it is. I did what you said and now all I see is one string of: "88888" where the rows are supposed to be. –  dotnetN00b Jul 6 '12 at 22:37
    
New problem with EditorTemplates. –  dotnetN00b Jul 6 '12 at 23:15
    
You are seeing one string because you didn't respect the naming convention. The naming convention says the following for collection editor templates: If you have a property IENumerable<FooBar> SomeName { get; set; }, the corresponding editor template must be located in ~/Views/Shared/EditorTemplates/FooBar.cshtml and this template will be automatically rendered for each element of the collection. In the new post you created, you didn't respect this convention. You wrote the following: y => y.RowInput.Where(z => types.Contains(z.RowCtrl.Type)) and then gave a name for the template. –  Darin Dimitrov Jul 7 '12 at 6:37

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