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Looping through the content of a file in Bash?

I have one file with a list of names. I need to loop through all names in this file from an external file with a shell script. How can I do that?

Example files:

scripts/names.txt

alison
barb
charlie
david

scripts/script.sh

NAMES="" #names from names.txt file
for NAME in $NAMES; do
    echo "$NAME"
done

How can I explode the names.txt file into an array in a separate shell script?

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marked as duplicate by J.F. Sebastian, casperOne Jul 10 '12 at 17:26

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

5 Answers

up vote 16 down vote accepted

One way would be:

while read NAME
do
    echo "$NAME"
done < names.txt

EDIT: Note that the loop gets executed in a sub-shell, so any modified variables will be local, except if you declare them with declare outside the loop.

Dennis Williamson is right. Sorry, must have used piped constructs too often and got confused.

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2  
No, since nothing is being piped into while, there's no subshell. Redirection into done doesn't create a subshell. –  Dennis Williamson Jul 5 '12 at 18:24
    
By the way, the issue (bug?) with pipes does not occur with korn shell (but does with pdksh). –  cdarke Jul 6 '12 at 8:12
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You'll be wanting to use the 'read' command

while read name
do
    echo "$name"
done < names.txt

Note that "$name" is quoted -- if it's not, it will be split using the characters in $IFS as delimiters. This probably won't be noticed if you're just echoing the variable, but if your file contains a list of file names which you want to copy, those will get broken down by $IFS if the variable is unquoted, which is not what you want or expect.

If you want to use Mike Clark's approach (loading into a variable rather than using read), you can do it without the use of cat:

NAMES="$(< scripts/names.txt)" #names from names.txt file
for NAME in $NAMES; do
    echo "$NAME"
done

The problem with this is that it loads the whole file into $NAMES, when you read it back out, you can either get the whole file (if quoted) or the file broken down by $IFS, if not quoted. By default, this will give you individual words, not individual lines. So if the name "Mary Jane" appeared on a line, you would get "Mary" and "Jane" as two separate names. Using read will get around this... although you could also change the value of $IFS

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I know the purists will hate this method, but you can cat the file.

NAMES=`cat scripts/names.txt` #names from names.txt file
for NAME in $NAMES; do
   echo "$NAME"
done
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1  
This has the advantage of not invoking a sub-shell, but will consider any space in names.txt as a delimiter. –  smocking Jul 5 '12 at 18:01
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cat names.txt|while read line; do
    echo "$line";
done
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2  
while read line; do ...; done < names.txt –  William Pursell Jul 5 '12 at 18:11
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This might work for you:

cat <<\! >names.txt
> alison
> barb
> charlie
> david
> !
OIFS=$IFS; IFS=$'\n'; NAMES=($(<names.txt)); IFS=$OIFS
echo "${NAMES[@]}"
alison barb charlie david
echo "${NAMES[0]}"
alison
for NAME in "${NAMES[@]}";do echo $NAME;done
alison
barb
charlie
david
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