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I often find myself writing conditionals similar to the following:

if(Path.GetExtension(filename) == ".pdf" || Path.GetExtension(filename)== ".doc")
{
    // do something
}

Calling Path.GetExtension() once per each file extension I want to test seems a little redundant. Granted, I could do something like this:

string fileExtension = Path.GetExtension(filename);
if(fileExtension == ".pdf" || fileExtension == ".doc")
{
    // do something
}

but considering I'm only using the fileExtension for the comparison and nothing else, declaring a variable for the file extension doesn't seem very elegant.

In SQL, I could use the IN operator:

SELECT file FROM table WHERE fileExtension IN(".pdf", ".doc")

which allows me to perform the test without no repetition.

Does C# offer any syntactic sugar similar to SQL's in, where I don't have to repeat the variable being compared or the equality operator?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Just create a new array inline and call Contains:

if((new[]{ ".pdf", ".doc"}).Contains(fileExtension))
{
    // Do Something
}
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I was expecting something like this. I think it's a little unfortunate to have to instantiate a new array just for the sake of comparison, but this does convey the intent well. –  Andrew Jul 5 '12 at 18:28

If you care about readability you could go for a

switch (fileExtension)
{
    case ".pdf":
    case ".doc":
        // do something                
        break;
}

It is also future proof in case you have to handle other extentions differently.

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Justin's answer would certainly do it. But seems like overkill to me. Certainly, unless you already have the extensions you are comparing against in a collection, it seems that would be quite a bit less efficient than simply comparing them directly like you do in your second example. (Your first example is a bad approach IMO.)

But note that storing the result in a variable as you do in your second example could be extremely efficient. If the variable is only used in the comparison that follows, there are all sorts of optimizations the compiler could make. It might not even have to create a variable at all.

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1  
It's unlikely that this piece of code is performance critical, so code readability is most important when choosing. IMO when there are more than two or three extensions, the array is clearly better. –  CodesInChaos Jul 5 '12 at 18:26
    
The example given did not have more than two or three extensions. If I were writing this and had more than a couple, I'd use a collection as well. But I would define it beforehand, possibly as a static member, and not create it each time I did the comparisons. Recreating the collection each time you compare and making it part of the compare statement seems neither readable or performant. –  Jonathan Wood Jul 5 '12 at 18:27

While I see that you've accepted a solution already, I'd like to submit mine as I think it follows your intent much more closely.

public static bool In(this object source, params object[] collection)
{
    return collection.Contains(source);
}

Usage:

if(Path.GetExtension(filename).In(".pdf", ".doc"))
{
    //Do something
}

Hope that helps.

EDIT: Added periods to the file extensions to accurately reflect how "GetExtension" functions.

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Thanks. This is cool and succinct. Just one thing to mention, Path.GetExtension(string) includes the leading '.', so it should be Path.GetExtension(filename).In(".pdf", ".doc"). I tried to edit but it wouldn't let me save because there's a 6 character minimum for edits. –  Andrew Aug 1 '12 at 19:35
    
Ahh, I see. You can add an "edit note" at the bottom that describes an edit you're making to go past the 6 character limit. I'll edit my answer to reflect it. –  Thebigcheeze Aug 1 '12 at 23:12

If you really want it to read like the SQL operator, you could use an extension method.

public static bool In(this object o, IEnumerable c)
{
    foreach (object i in c)
    {
        if (i.Equals(o))
        {
            return true;
        }
    }
    return false;
}

Usage:

string fileExtension = ".pdf";
string[] acceptedFileExtensions = new[] { ".pdf", ".doc" };

if (fileExtension.In(acceptedFileExtensions))
{
    // Do something
}
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