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Is there a method available (i.e. without me creating my own recursive method), for a given xpath (or other method of identifying the hierarchical position) to create/update an XML node, where the node would be created if it does not exist? This would need to create the parent node if it does not exist as well. I do have an XSD which includes all possible nodes.

i.e. Before:

<employee>
   <name>John Smith</name>
</employee>

Would like to call something like this:

CoolXmlUpdateMethod("/employee/address/city", "Los Angeles");

After:

  <employee>
       <name>John Smith</name>
       <address>
         <city>Los Angeles</city>
       </address>
    </employee>

Or even a method to create a node, given an xpath, wherein it will recursively create the parent node(s) if they do not exist?

As far as the application (if it matters), this is taking an existing XML doc that contains only populated nodes, and adding data to it from another system. The new data may or may not already have values populated in the source XML.

Surely this is not an uncommon scenario?

share|improve this question
    
XPath is a query language for XML documents and as such it cannot modify a document's structure (including deleting or creating new nodes). XSLT was created exactly for programming XML document transformatons -- this particular one is trivial to do with XSLT. Would you be interested in an XSLT solution? –  Dimitre Novatchev Jul 5 '12 at 22:44

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Well, what we do is create a class that represents the XML (we use XSD2Code to generate one from the XSD), and when it's deserialized/serialized, it can do that sort of thing for you (XMLSerializer).

share|improve this answer
    
That was actually 'Plan B', but is a pretty heavy solution given that XSD2Code generated a 312,000 line class from my 6MB XSD (EDI 837P medical claim) and this needs to be executed thousands of times in a process. I think even the serialization/deserialization is going to be pretty slow...but granted it is a viable solution to the sample presented - perhaps just not with my production scope. –  ScottBai Jul 5 '12 at 21:01
    
I'm going to mark this as the answer as I think it's the best approach, and I actually ended up doing this, but creating my own XML Serialization classes for only the nodes that I really needed, which was a very small subset of what the automated tools create from the XSD directly. –  ScottBai Aug 14 '12 at 19:24

Chris Knight's solution has a bug. If you have:

<a></a>
<b>
  <a>
  </a>
</b> 

and do 
UpdateOrCreate ("<b><a>") 
it will update first node , not nested one.

Here is my function:

/// <summary>
/// Creates nessecary parent nodes using the provided Queue, and assigns the value to the last child node.
/// </summary>
/// <param name="ele">XElement to take action on</param>
/// <param name="nodes">Queue of node names</param>
/// <param name="value">Value for last child node</param>
/// <param name="attr1Name">Optional name for an attribute, can be null</param>
/// <param name="attr1Val">Optional value for an attribute, can be null</param>
/// returns created/updated element        
public static XElement UpdateOrCreateXmlNode(XElement ele, Queue<string> nodes, string value, string attr1Name = null, string attr1Val = null)
{            
    int fullQueueCOunt = nodes.Count;
    for (int i = 0; i < fullQueueCOunt; i++)
    {
        string node = nodes.Dequeue();
        XElement firstChildMatch = ele.Elements(node).FirstOrDefault();
        if (firstChildMatch == null)
        {
            XElement newChlid = new XElement(node);
            ele.Add(newChlid);
            ele = newChlid;
        }
        else
            ele = firstChildMatch;
    }
    if (attr1Name != null && attr1Val != null)
    {
        if (ele.Attribute(attr1Name) == null)
            ele.Add(new XAttribute(attr1Name, attr1Val));
        else
            ele.Attribute(attr1Name).Value = attr1Val;
    }
    ele.Value = value;
    return ele;
}
share|improve this answer

I have done something like this before. I am using LINQ to XML. I created an extension method for XElement that takes a Queue of node names, and a value for the last node in your list. Here is the extension method I made:

/// <summary>
    /// Creates nessecary parent nodes using the provided Queue, and assigns the value to the last child node.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="ele">XElement to take action on</param>
    /// <param name="nodes">Queue of node names</param>
    /// <param name="value">Value for last child node</param>
    public static void UpdateOrCreate(this XElement ele, Queue<string> nodes, string value)
    {
        string previousNodeName = "";
        int fullQueueCOunt = nodes.Count;
        for (int i = 0; i < fullQueueCOunt; i++)
        {
            string node = nodes.Dequeue();
            if (ele.Descendants(node).FirstOrDefault() == null)
            {
                if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(previousNodeName))
                {
                    ele.Element(previousNodeName).Add(new XElement(node));
                }
                else
                {
                    // use main parent node if this is the first iteration
                    ele.Add(new XElement(node));
                }
            }
            previousNodeName = node;
        }
        // assign the value of the last child element
        ele.Descendants(previousNodeName).First().Value = value;
    }

And here is a sample implementation:

XElement element = XElement.Parse(
                "<employee>" +
                   "<name>John Smith</name>" +
                "</employee>");
            Queue<string> nodeQueue = new Queue<string>();
            nodeQueue.Enqueue("address");
            nodeQueue.Enqueue("city");
            element.UpdateOrCreate(nodeQueue, "myValue");

This will take the input XML:

<employee>
  <name>John Smith</name>
</employee>

And change it to:

<employee>
  <name>John Smith</name>
  <address>
    <city>myValue</city>
  </address>
</employee>

This will also work if the 'address' and/or 'city' nodes already exist.

share|improve this answer

I just struggled with this myself, so thought I'd add an answer which works with .Net 2.0 using C#.

private static void addOrUpdateNode(XmlDocument xmlDoc, string xpath, string value)
{
    XmlNode node = xmlDoc.SelectSingleNode(xpath);
    if (node == null)
    {
        //node does not exist, so create it
        string newNodeString = String.Format(
            "<city>{0}</city>", value); //as per OP's example
        StringReader sr = new StringReader(newNodeString);
        XmlTextReader reader = new XmlTextReader(sr);
        XmlNode newNode = xmlDoc.ReadNode(reader);
        //adding to root of document, you may want to
        //navigate to a different part of the doc
        xmlDoc.AppendChild(newNode);
    }
    else
    {
        node.Value = value;
    }
}

Forgive me for leaving it pretty rough and untested, anyone who wants to clean it up feel free to edit.

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