Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a list of tuples like [(0, 34), (1, 77), (2, 6), (3, 60), (6, 2), (7, 5), (9, 13), (14, 2)]. I need to keep the tuples order and reenumerate second elements with integers from 0 to n - 1, where n is the list length. The result should be [(0, 4), (1, 6), (2, 2), (3, 5), (6, 0), (7, 1), (9, 3), (14, 0)].

I began writing a function that accepts integer sequences, but not integer pairs:

def translation(seq):
    return [sorted(set(seq)).index(x) for x in seq]

>>> translate([34, 77, 6, 60, 2, 5, 13, 2])
[4, 6, 2, 5, 0, 1, 3, 0]

`

share|improve this question
    
Hint: when sorting a sequence of sequences, you can specify which element to sort by, using the named argument key. –  Joel Cornett Jul 5 '12 at 19:31
    
Does it have to be 4, 6, 2 etc... have to be unique, or can it be any number between 0 and len(seq) - 1 ? –  Jon Clements Jul 5 '12 at 19:50
    
The given list can have second elements greater than len(seq), but the number in result must be unique unless there is a repetition. For instance, [(1, 8), (4, 9), (12, 8)] should be translated to [(1, 0), (4, 1), (12, 0)]. –  Marcos da Silva Sampaio Jul 5 '12 at 19:54
    
@MarcosdaSilvaSampaio If two tuples share the same second element such as (1, 8) and (12, 8) in your previous comment, should the first element be considered for the ordering?. Note that [(1, 8), (4, 9), (12, 8)] can also be translated to [(1, 0), (4, 2), (12, 1)] since you didn't specify. –  dallen Jul 5 '12 at 20:23
    
@dallen, All repeated second element must be considered. In my example: translation([(1, 8), (4, 9), (12, 8)]) == [(1, 0), (4, 1), (12, 0)]. –  Marcos da Silva Sampaio Jul 5 '12 at 20:32
show 4 more comments

2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Try this. I modified the code you've given so it should be easy for you to understand.

def translation(seq):
    return [(x[0], sorted(seq, key=lambda t: t[1]).index(x)) for x in seq]

Sample usage:

>>> translation([(0, 34), (1, 77), (2, 6), (3, 60), (6, 2), (7, 5), (9, 13)])
[(0, 4), (1, 6), (2, 2), (3, 5), (6, 0), (7, 1), (9, 3)]

The key parameter in sorted lets you pass a function to do the ordering, the function lambda t: t[1] allows for the second element of each tuple to be used for ordering.

UPDATE

I updated my solution so translation([(1, 8), (4, 9), (12, 8)]) returns [(1, 0), (4, 1), (12, 0)].

def translation(seq):
    l = list(set(sorted([x[1] for x in seq])))
    return [(x[0], l.index(x[1])) for x in seq]
share|improve this answer
add comment

Maybe this:

xs = [(0, 34), (1, 77), (2, 6), (3, 60), (4, 2), (5, 5), (6, 13)] 
secs = sorted(set(x[1] for x in xs))
res = [(x[0], secs.index(x[1])) for x in xs]
print res # [(0, 4), (1, 6), (2, 2), (3, 5), (4, 0), (5, 1), (6, 3)]

or one single comprehension (but with quadratic performance):

res = [(x[0], sum(1 for y in xs if y[1] < x[1])) for x in xs]
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.