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I'm building an app in VB.NET to read rows from an Excel file and populate them into a DataTable.

dtRow = dataTable.NewRow()
Dim startTime As DateTime = DateTime.Now

dtRow("name") = suppliers.CellValue("A", rowCount)
/* SNIP - just more string retrieval */
dtRow("statistics") = suppliers.CellValue("P", rowCount)

dataTable.Rows.Add(dtRow)

Dim endTime As DateTime = DateTime.Now

Debug.Print(String.Format("Time elapsed to retrieve '{0}': {1} ms", rowCount, (endTime - startTime).ToString("fffffff")))

CellValue is my own creation- but it is a small function and I've already measured its elapsed time. It's quite fast.

However, when I open a 10,000 row Excel file (filled with identical data), the time to process gets much slower.

3,000 rows:

Time elapsed to retrieve '2': 0510051 ms
Time elapsed to retrieve '3': 0500050 ms
Time elapsed to retrieve '4': 0340034 ms
Time elapsed to retrieve '5': 0350035 ms
Time elapsed to retrieve '6': 0340034 ms
Time elapsed to retrieve '7': 0340034 ms
Time elapsed to retrieve '8': 0350035 ms

6,000 rows:

Time elapsed to retrieve '2': 0710071 ms
Time elapsed to retrieve '3': 0760076 ms
Time elapsed to retrieve '4': 0620062 ms
Time elapsed to retrieve '5': 0670067 ms
Time elapsed to retrieve '6': 0750075 ms
Time elapsed to retrieve '7': 0750075 ms
Time elapsed to retrieve '8': 0700070 ms

10,000 rows:

Time elapsed to retrieve '2': 0920092 ms
Time elapsed to retrieve '3': 0920092 ms
Time elapsed to retrieve '4': 1790179 ms
Time elapsed to retrieve '5': 1810181 ms
Time elapsed to retrieve '6': 1930193 ms
Time elapsed to retrieve '7': 2240224 ms
Time elapsed to retrieve '8': 1820182 ms

enter image description here

Why does this occur? Can I fix it?

EDIT: suppliers is a class I have created to handle the Excel file, with this constructor:

Public Sub New(ByVal doc As SpreadsheetDocument, ByVal sheetName As String)
    pWorkbookPart = doc.WorkbookPart

    Dim sheet As Sheet = pWorkbookPart.Workbook.Descendants(Of Sheet).Where(Function(s) s.Name = sheetName).FirstOrDefault()

    pWorksheetPart = CType(pWorkbookPart.GetPartById(sheet.Id), WorksheetPart)

    pSharedStringTable = pWorkbookPart.GetPartsOfType(Of SharedStringTablePart).FirstOrDefault()
End Sub

CellValue:

Public Function CellValue(ByVal column As String, ByVal row As Integer) As String
    Dim cellAddress As String = column & row
    Dim cell As Cell = pWorksheetPart.Worksheet.Descendants(Of Cell).Where(Function(c) c.CellReference = cellAddress).FirstOrDefault()

    Dim index As Integer
    Dim returnValue As String

    If cell IsNot Nothing Then
        If cell.DataType IsNot Nothing Then
            index = Integer.Parse(cell.InnerText)
            returnValue = pSharedStringTable.SharedStringTable.ElementAt(index).InnerText
        Else
            returnValue = CStr(cell.InnerText)
        End If
    End If

    Return returnValue
End Function
share|improve this question
    
Sounds like memory pressure is causing more wall time to be taken up by garbage collection. –  user7116 Jul 5 '12 at 19:44
    
What is the type of suppliers? –  John Koerner Jul 5 '12 at 19:45
    
@sixlettervariables Any recommendations? Should I do my processing sans DataRows first, and then throw them all into a DataTable? Will that fix anything? –  David B Jul 5 '12 at 19:46
    
@JohnKoerner I've added to the question. –  David B Jul 5 '12 at 19:47
    
Can you add the definition of CellValue on that class? –  John Koerner Jul 5 '12 at 19:49

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This line looks suspcious:

Dim cell As Cell = pWorksheetPart.Worksheet.Descendants(Of Cell).Where(Function(c) c.CellReference = cellAddress).FirstOrDefault()

If the .Where() condition executes against every cell in the spreadsheet. As the number of rows grows, the number of cell address comparisons grows by (rows x columns). Even if the cell reference comparison operation is trivially simple, it adds up fast.

If the OpenXML or the Workbook class shown do not provide convenient x,y cell addressing, you may have to create your own indexes. Make one pass over all the cells to add them to your own column lists, then you can index by x,y with abandon. x = index of the column list from the list of columns, y = index into the column list to fetch the cell.

share|improve this answer
    
I will do some tests, and come back with an answer on the time span of that command. –  David B Jul 5 '12 at 20:08
    
That appears to be it, the 3000 rows one looks up much faster than the 10000 rows one. –  David B Jul 5 '12 at 20:12
    
Are you reading the spreadsheet file yourself, or are you connecting to an instance of the Excel program and fetching the data via Excel? –  dthorpe Jul 5 '12 at 20:13
    
The expression in the .Where() clause is going to be executed against every cell in the spreadsheet. Is there any other way to fetch a column of data? –  dthorpe Jul 5 '12 at 20:15
    
If by instance, you mean using a PIA, I'm not, I'm using the OpenXML SDK (opening and reading the file myself). There most likely is, I am going to work on a solution now. –  David B Jul 5 '12 at 20:16

One possible problem, if your string table gets very large, is that ElementAt is likely unoptimized for the case of traversing a SharedStringTable. Since this table is static with respect to your processing, I suggest getting rid of the part and instead storing it using a List<string> or array:

' Use this instead of pSharedStringTable
' Dim sharedStringTable As New List(Of String)

' Initialize your string table
sharedStringTable.AddRange( _
    From xml In pSharedStringTable.SharedStringTable _
    Select xml.InnerText)

' Now you can use sharedStringTable.ElementAt(index) and enjoy optimization
' Or you can use sharedStringTable(index)

Another possible problem is the constant linear searches for cells by reference. Instead you should convert this to a dictionary:

' Dim cells As New Dictionary(Of String, Of Cell)
For Each cell In pWorksheetPart.Worksheet.Descendants(Of Cell)
    cells.Add(cell.CellReference.InnerText, cell)
Next cell
' Only one round-trip to Excel for cells using this method

In each of these cases you would be trading memory for time, and in both cases I believe this to be in your best interest:

' Revised lookup using data structures optimized for common access
If cells.TryGetValue(cellAddress, cell) Then
    If cell.DataType IsNot Nothing Then
        index = Integer.Parse(cell.InnerText)
        returnValue = sharedStringTable(index)
    Else
        returnValue = CStr(cell.InnerText)
    End If
End If
share|improve this answer
    
While this is a good idea, I don't think it's the answer because my entire Excel document is the same row pasted over and over. It has maybe 10 unique strings out of all of them. However, it would be good to implement for real-world application. –  David B Jul 5 '12 at 20:06
    
@DavidB: I ended up adding a suggestion for the cell issue. –  user7116 Jul 5 '12 at 20:18

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