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I'm currently attempting to build a renderer for dynamic forms. At present I have two types of questions - a text question & a multiple choice question.

Based on the question type I need to create a renderer object - however I need to check the sub-type that implements IQuestion in each renderer class. Does this break LSP? Question types aren't generally compatible with each other (i.e. you'd never render a text question as a multiple choice question), so it appears it would break LSP. Any suggestions on how to improve this? Ideally I'd like a form definition object that holds all the questions to be asked, however I don't want to add a new property for each question type (i.e. I would like to add a new question class and a supporting renderer class).

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        //Imagine this is obtained in a separate method call
        IEnumerable<IQuestion> questions = new IQuestion[] { new Question { Text = "Name" }, new MultipleChoiceQuestion() { Text = "Title", Choices = new string[] { "Mr", "Mrs" } } };

        IEnumerable<QuestionRenderer> renderers = new QuestionRenderer[] { new QuestionRenderer(), new MultipleChoiceQuestionRenderer() };

        //Now need to build renderers for the questions
        foreach (var q in questions)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(renderers.Single(x => x.CanRender(q)));
        }

        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}

public interface IQuestion
{
    string Text { get; set; }
}

public class Question : IQuestion
{
    public string Text { get; set; }
}

public class MultipleChoiceQuestion : IQuestion
{
    public string Text { get; set; }
    public string[] Choices { get; set; }
}

public  class QuestionRenderer
{
    public virtual bool CanRender(IQuestion q)
    {
        if(q is Question)
        {
            return true;
        }

        return false;
    }
}

public class MultipleChoiceQuestionRenderer : QuestionRenderer
{
    public override bool CanRender(IQuestion q)
    {
        if (q is MultipleChoiceQuestion)
        {
            return true;
        }

        return false;
    }
}
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1 Answer

I think the Chain of Responsibility pattern would be a better way to handle this, than expecting one and only one renderer per question type.

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So basically I'd have a chain of renderers? That would allow me to add new types into a chain moving forward and potentially have more adaptable rendering rules. How about the upcasting part though (as you'd need to check question type)? Would this be considered a violation of LSP? –  user213145 Jul 5 '12 at 20:40
    
I don't see a need to upcast in this pattern. Each renderer implements CanRender and presumably Render. It's not necessary for the controller to know what type of renderer it's working with, hence LSP is not violated. It would only be a violation where one Renderer can't be substituted for another. –  neontapir Jul 5 '12 at 20:47
1  
Why are you concerned about LSP? You are using the Liskov substitution principle in loading your renderers. How can that possibly be a violation of a principle that states you can do what you are doing? :) –  SASS_Shooter Jul 5 '12 at 20:49
    
When I say upcast I meant in each of the renderers, however each of these checks is encapsulated within the specific renderer. I just wasn't sure as each renderer class is provided with the interface, rather than the specific type if this was an LSP issue. Good to hear that it sounds like this isn't the case. Thanks for your help! –  user213145 Jul 5 '12 at 20:50
    
Probably just being a bit paranoid and also want to make sure I fully understand the pattern. Sounds like I'm on the right track :) –  user213145 Jul 5 '12 at 20:52
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