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Is there a way to easily determine if the language the device is set to is right to left (RTL)?

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5 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

NSLocale has two methods +characterDirectionForLanguage: and +lineDirectionForLanguage:. The first is presumably Left-to-Right vs Right-to-Left and the second is Top-to-Bottom vs Bottom-to-Top. You can pass it the result of [[NSLocale currentLocale] objectForKey:NSLocaleLanguageCode].

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The answers provided are incorrect.

They return the current region of the device - not the currently selected language. The region and language are often the same. However, if I am in North America and I set my language to Japanese, my region will still be English (United States). In order to check the character direction of the currently selected language, you can do:

+ (BOOL)isDeviceLanguageRTL {
  return ([NSLocale characterDirectionForLanguage:[[NSLocale preferredLanguages] objectAtIndex:0]] == NSLocaleLanguageDirectionRightToLeft);
}

You may likely want to cache the result, using dispatch_once.

Keep in mind that this is the user's preferred language direction, and not necessarily the language direction of the text. For that, use a C function that is based on u_charDirection.

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Here is how i Used it :

+(NSTextAlignment) alignmentOfLanguage {
if ([NSLocale characterDirectionForLanguage:[[NSLocale preferredLanguages] objectAtIndex:0]]==NSLocaleLanguageDirectionRightToLeft){
        return NSTextAlignmentRight;
    }
   return NSTextAlignmentLeft;  
}

The Last example didn't work for me , but with a little variant , i got it rightX2 .

any comments?

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Thanks to Kevin Ballard's answer I was able to create the following utility function to do this:

+ (BOOL)isDeviceLanguageRTL {
   return [NSLocale characterDirectionForLanguage:[[NSLocale currentLocale] objectForKey:NSLocaleLanguageCode]]==NSLocaleLanguageDirectionRightToLeft;
}
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Rose Perrone is completely correct. However the use of dispatch_once in a getter for a simple boolean value - is really too much overhead. Unnecessary use of dispatch once. Because you will probably want to use that many times inside a layout or drawing function.

So you have two faster options:

+ (BOOL)isRtl
{
    static BOOL isRtl = NO;
    static BOOL isRtlFound = NO;
    if (!isRtlFound)
    { // This is "safe enough". Worst case is this code will be called twice in the app's lifecycle...
        isRtl = [NSLocale characterDirectionForLanguage:[NSBundle mainBundle].preferredLocalizations[0]] == NSLocaleLanguageDirectionRightToLeft;
        isRtlFound = YES;
    }
    return isRtl;
}

Or just cache it in a static variable, using the static constructor:

static BOOL s_isRtl = NO;
+ initialize
{
    s_isRtl = [NSLocale characterDirectionForLanguage:[NSBundle mainBundle].preferredLocalizations[0]] == NSLocaleLanguageDirectionRightToLeft;
}

Note that this will actually share the static variable between any class that uses this code.

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dispatch_once refresher: "This function is useful for initialization of global data (singletons) in an application. Always call this function before using or testing any variables that are initialized by the block. If called simultaneously from multiple threads, this function waits synchronously until the block has completed. The predicate must point to a variable stored in global or static scope." –  SK9 Nov 15 '13 at 21:19
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