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Is it possible to have a function like this

public string Foo()
{
    Task.Factory.StartNew(Foo2());
    return "computedUniqueId";
}

The thing is that I want to start that Foo2 task AFTER Foo returns a value. The reason I ask this is that caller of Foo() function will be listening for information with that "computedUniqueId". Foo2() will trigger that information so there could be a situation that listener would not not what to wait for and will miss that message. So to summarize: Is there something(like continueWith) that will assert that Foo() returns its value before Foo2() kicks in ?

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2 Answers 2

That's not possible because return is the last thing that happens in that method. After a return, the method in question has relinquished control and scope back to the caller. Period. The best I can think of is if you call Foo2 from where ever the string "computerUniqueId" is getting returned to.

Maybe if you supply more details we can help out more. Thanks.

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Is there something(like continueWith) that will assert that Foo() returns its value before Foo2() kicks in ?

No. The problem is that you can't control the listening side of the equation. If it's important for the listener to know the unique ID in advance, I would split this into two portions, and pass the unique identifier to the task itself:

public string GenerateFooId()
{ 
    return "computedUniqueId";
}
public void Foo(string id)
{
    Task.Factory.StartNew(Foo2(id));
}

This way, you can always guarantee that the caller will know the ID prior to starting the task (as the caller must supply the ID properly). Making the ID a custom type could give you more safety and control, as you could prevent anything but GenerateFooId from being able to generate this ID.

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