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I'm using the MySQL command line utility and can navigate through a database. Now I need to see a list of user accounts. How can I do this?

I'm using MySQL version 5.4.1.

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9 Answers 9

up vote 801 down vote accepted

Use this query:

SELECT User FROM mysql.user;

Which will output a table like this:

+-------+
| User  |
+-------+
| root  |
+-------+
| user2 |
+-------+

As Matthew Scharley points out in the comments on this answer, you can group by the User column if you'd only like to see unique usernames.

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26  
I think it may be necessary to group on User too, to only get unique user values, since there's a seperate row for each user@host entry. –  Matthew Scharley Jul 16 '09 at 4:22
2  
How to find the same info without sql query ?? –  Divyanshu Oct 21 '13 at 12:20
4  
@barrycarter DELETE FROM mysql.user; better have WHERE user='someuser' and host='somehost'; If you do DELETE FROM mysql.user;, all users are gone. Logins after the next mysql restart or FLUSH PRIVILEGES; eliminate users from memory. Here is an example of one of my posts on doing DELETE FROM mysql.user responsibly : dba.stackexchange.com/questions/4614/… –  RolandoMySQLDBA May 4 '14 at 11:43
    
@RolandoMySQLDBA I probably should've added a smiley face to my last comment :) I was joking, and wondering if deleting all users would delete ALL access to the db, including the access to restore users (ie, pulling the rug out from under your own feet). –  barrycarter May 4 '14 at 14:47
    
Is it also possible to view the tables each user has rights to? –  Geoffrey Jan 29 at 9:06

I find this format the most useful as it includes the host field which is important in MySQL to distinguish between user records.

select User,Host from mysql.user;
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A user account comprises the username and the host level access.

Therefore, this is the query that gives all user accounts

SELECT CONCAT(QUOTE(user),'@',QUOTE(host)) UserAccount FROM mysql.user;
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3  
This is basically the same as spkane's answer. What is the benefit of concatenating the user and host columns? –  Iain Elder Oct 14 '13 at 21:00
4  
One example: the user@host format is used for setting passwords. Omitting the host from the SET PASSWORD command produces an error. SET PASSWORD FOR wordpressuser = PASSWORD('...'); produces the error ERROR 1133 (42000): Can't find any matching row in the user table. Include the host and it works. SET PASSWORD FOR wordpressuser@localhost = PASSWORD('...'); produces Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.00 sec). –  Iain Elder Oct 14 '13 at 21:21
    
Best answer, whatever the naysayers may complain about. Only thing i'd change were appending an ORDER BY user to it. –  sjas May 22 at 10:30

If you are referring to the actual MySQL users, try:

select User from mysql.user;
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to avoid repetitions of users when they connect from different origin:

select distinct User from mysql.user;
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SELECT * FROM mysql.user;

It's a big table so you might want to be more selective on what fields you choose.

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I got 3 root users with different hosts. localhost, 127.0.0.1 and ::1. Which one must I keep and what must I delete? Thanks! –  emotality Jan 28 at 12:03
1  
If you don't want people to connect via the network, the old standard was to delete all of these. Nowadays, though, it seems the recommendation is to keep localhost ones, as they are not accessible over the network anyway; this means you should instead keep all of them. –  trysis Mar 21 at 13:52

Peter and Jesse are correct but just make sure you first select the mysql DB.

use mysql;

select User from mysql.user;

that should do your trick

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12  
It's not necessery to use mysql; in case you scope the table to the mysql database like you did. You can just select User from mysql.user; –  vitaLee Mar 26 '13 at 19:45
2  
Adding use mysql; is just so you can use select User from user; instead select User from mysql.user; since it is usually a one time query, there is no need to use the mysql db –  Dan Oct 24 '13 at 11:25

Login to mysql as root and type following query

select User from mysql.user;

+------+
| User |
+------+
| amon |
| root |
| root |
+------+
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4  
Thanks for your answer, but that doesn't add anything on top of the answers that are already here. –  Rup Mar 4 '14 at 10:57
    
agree with you ..i saw these answers after your comment... –  sandip divekar Mar 4 '14 at 15:34
    
I'd say +1 for mentioning logging in as root. I tried without doing so and it didn't work ;) –  leenephi Mar 25 '14 at 22:27
    
You need to give privileges to user1 to display user list. Without root user you will get error. So first provide the privileges. Log in as root user then type command GRANT SELECT ON mysql.user TO 'user1'@'localhost'; now login as user1 and type command select User from mysql.user; You will see user list displayed. :) +1 Enjoy –  sandip divekar Mar 26 '14 at 9:16

The mysql.db table is possibly more important in determining user rights. I think an entry in it is created if you mention a table in the GRANT command. In my case the mysql.users table showed no permissions for a user when it obviously was able to connect and select etc.

mysql> select * from mysql.db; mysql> select * from db; +---------------+-----------------+--------+-------------+-------------+-------------+--------| Host | Db | User | Select_priv | Insert_priv | Update_priv | Del...

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In my view what is important is what users are allowed to do on the database. So "SHOW GRANTS" is quite useful since it shows who is allowed to do what. –  Spookiecookie Apr 5 at 19:09

protected by Yuck Dec 27 '14 at 20:17

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