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I'm creating an queued upload manager. With this answer to my previous question's guidance, I'll be using a Service, to upload these images. It was recommended that I use a database to keep track of the successfully uploaded, and the pending files.

My initial research leads me to believe that I'll want to create a Bound Service, so I can update my UI once the photos have uploaded, as well as a Started Service, so it can run independent of my Activities that create it. It seems that I'll also need to start it in its own process via the process=":something" directive in the app manifest.

My question is, what would the best way of sharing an SQLite (unless there is a better way) database amongst the N activity clients and the uploader service?

I envision it working like this, in pseudo code:

// in an app
writeRecordToDb( . . . );

// start service
if( service doesn't exist )
{
  // start service, and bind
}

// in the service:
if( shared db has another row )
{
  doDownload( . . . );

  if( download worked )
  {
    notifyActivity();

    if( db has another row )
      doDownload( . . . );
  }
  else
  {
    retryDownload( . . . );
  }
}

Is this the correct way to go about this? I'm again attempting to circumvent the problem of having multiple Activity instances request photo uploads when there is little to no cellular signal. I've just finished reading though the Service and Bound Service docs, and I'm feeling good, but not great.

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Further to the answers already posted, I see from the question you linked to that a deciding factor in the queuing mechanism is that of network connectivity. I use a BroadcastReceiver to 'listen' for changes in connectivity and couple it with an IntentService. My Activities send network requests to the IntentService and if there's no connectivity, it adds the request to a queue and terminates. Whenever the BroadcastReceiver receives a network 'connected' Intent it starts the IntentService which then processes anything previously queued. –  Squonk Jul 5 '12 at 21:47

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

My initial research leads me to believe that I'll want to create a Bound Service

I wouldn't.

so I can update my UI once the photos have uploaded

You do not need to use the binding pattern to update the UI. You can:

  • send a local broadcast using LocalBroadcastManager that the activity picks up, or
  • invoke a PendingIntent supplied in an Intent extra on startActivity() by the activity, or
  • give Square's Otto event bus a try (looks interesting, but I haven't used it yet)
  • etc.

as well as a Started Service, so it can run independent of my Activities that create it

Which is why you should not bother with binding, as you do not need that, but you do need to start the service.

My question is, what would the best way of sharing an SQLite (unless there is a better way) database amongst the N activity clients and the uploader service?

Option #1: Keep your SQLiteOpenHelper in a static data member

Option #2: Use a ContentProvider wrapper around your database

Is this the correct way to go about this?

Using a database as a communications channel between components is akin to two next-door neighbors communicating with each other using a banner towed by a biplane. Yes, it works. However, it is slow and expensive.

(also, there's never a biplane when you need one, but I digress...)

If you wish to use a database as a backing store for pending downloads, in case there is some interruption (e.g., user powers down the device) and you wish to pick up those downloads later on, that's fine. However, the service will know what to download by the command you send to it via startService().

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CommonsWare covers basically everything you need... but here is some code illustrating the two options just in case there is any confusion.

  1. Keep your SQLiteOpenHelper in a static data member.

    public class DatabaseHelper extends SQLiteOpenHelper { 
        private static DatabaseHelper mInstance = null;
    
        private static final String DATABASE_NAME = "databaseName";
        private static final String DATABASE_TABLE = "tableName";
        private static final int DATABASE_VERSION = 1;
    
        private Context mCxt;
    
        public static DatabaseHelper getInstance(Context ctx) {
            /** 
             * use the application context as suggested by CommonsWare.
             * this will ensure that you dont accidentally leak an Activitys
             * context (see this article for more information: 
             * http://developer.android.com/resources/articles/avoiding-memory-leaks.html)
             */
            if (mInstance == null) {
                mInstance = new DatabaseHelper(ctx.getApplicationContext());
            }
            return mInstance;
        }
    
        /**
         * constructor should be private to prevent direct instantiation.
         * make call to static factory method "getInstance()" instead.
         */
        private DatabaseHelper(Context ctx) {
            super(context, DATABASE_NAME, null, DATABASE_VERSION);
            this.mCtx = ctx;
        }
    }
    

    Then in your Service/Activity, keep a reference to your DatabaseHelper and call getInstance() on it.

  2. Wrap the database in a ContentProvider. If you already have one implemented, then you can simply use

    mContext.getContentResolver().query(...);
    

    This works because Activity and Service both extend Context (which holds a reference to the ContentResolver).

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