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I am working on a Java application to record the screen. I am doing this using a Robot to take several screenshots, save them to a temporary folder and I then use JpegImagesToMovie.java to build these into a QuickTime movie file.

The problem I am experiencing is that, despite developing my script to run at 20fps, I only achieve around 5fps. I have tracked this down to the disk speed in that it is taking too long to save the image to disk and this is holding up the rest of the script.

Next, I modified the script to store the images in an array of BufferedImages and then write them to disk once recording has stopped which fixes the frame rate, however when recoding, Java will quickly run out of memory (After a few seconds of recording).

Does anyone have any ideas or experience with doing this. One solution I can think of is if there is a way to increase the compression on the JPEG images but I am unsure of how to do this.

Any help would be greatly appreciated!

share|improve this question
2  
To get 20fps, you should probably be using a real video codec instead of blasting JPEGs on the drive –  millimoose Jul 5 '12 at 22:06
    
The Screen Recorder seen at Monte Media Library can do full-screen (1920x1080px here) video capture at 20 FPS. It uses the JMF & encodes directly to MOV or AVI. –  Andrew Thompson Jul 5 '12 at 23:19
    
That looks like what I wanted! Will have a play with it when I get home from work and report back. –  camerongray Jul 6 '12 at 10:45

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

One option you might want to consider is to do the processing on multiple threads. One thread can be dedicated to taking screenshots, and many other threads can write to disk. Since writing to disk is not a CPU-intensive operation you can have many of them running concurrently, each one writing to a different files. The following program works fine on my machine with 512M heap size:

import javax.imageio.ImageIO;
import java.awt.*;
import java.awt.image.BufferedImage;
import java.io.File;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.util.Date;
import java.util.Timer;
import java.util.TimerTask;
import java.util.concurrent.*;
import java.util.concurrent.atomic.AtomicInteger;

public class ImageWritingMain
{
  public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception
  {
    // a queue
    final BlockingQueue<BufferedImage> queue = 
        new LinkedBlockingQueue<BufferedImage>();

    // schedule a thread to take 20 images per second and put them in 
    // the queue
    int fps = 20;
    final ScreenShotRecorder recorder = 
        new ScreenShotRecorder(new Robot(), queue);
    Timer timer = new Timer();
    timer.scheduleAtFixedRate(recorder, 0, (1000L/fps));

    // make a directory to hold the screenshot images
    String id = new Date().toString().replace(' ', '-').replace(':', '-');
    File imageDir = new File("images-" + id);
    imageDir.mkdirs();

    // start 10 threads, and each thread reads from the queue and 
    // writes the image to a file
    int nWriterThreads = 10;
    ExecutorService threadPool = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(nWriterThreads);
    for (int i = 0; i < nWriterThreads; i++)
    {
      ImageWriter task = new ImageWriter(queue, imageDir);
      threadPool.submit(task);
    }
    System.out.println("Started all threads ..");

    // wait as long as you want the program to run (1 minute, for example) ...
    Thread.sleep(60 * 1000L);
    // .. and shutdown the threads
    System.out.println("Shutting down all threads");
    threadPool.shutdownNow();
    timer.cancel();

    if (! queue.isEmpty())
    {
      System.out.println("Writing " + queue.size() + " remaining images");
      // write the remaining images to disk in the main thread
      ImageWriter writer = new ImageWriter(queue, imageDir);
      BufferedImage img = null;
      while ((img = queue.poll()) != null)
      {
        writer.writeImageToFile(img);
      }
    }
  }
}

class ScreenShotRecorder extends TimerTask
{
  private static final Rectangle screenRect = 
      new Rectangle(Toolkit.getDefaultToolkit().getScreenSize());
  private static final AtomicInteger counter = new AtomicInteger();
  private final Robot robot;
  private final BlockingQueue<BufferedImage> imageQueue;

  ScreenShotRecorder(Robot robot, BlockingQueue<BufferedImage> imageQueue)
  {
    this.robot = robot;
    this.imageQueue = imageQueue;
  }

  @Override
  public void run()
  {
    try
    {
      BufferedImage image = robot.createScreenCapture(screenRect);
      imageQueue.put(image);
      System.out.println(Thread.currentThread() + 
          ": Took screenshot #" + counter.incrementAndGet());
    }
    catch (InterruptedException e)
    {
      System.out.println("Finishing execution of " + Thread.currentThread());
      return;
    }
    catch (Exception e)
    {
      e.printStackTrace();
    }
  }
}

class ImageWriter implements Runnable
{
  private static final AtomicInteger counter = new AtomicInteger();
  private final BlockingQueue<BufferedImage> imageQueue;
  private final File dir;

  ImageWriter(BlockingQueue<BufferedImage> imageQueue, File dir)
  {
    this.imageQueue = imageQueue;
    this.dir = dir;
  }

  @Override
  public void run()
  {
    while (true)
    {
      try
      {
        BufferedImage image = imageQueue.take();
        writeImageToFile(image);
      }
      catch (InterruptedException e)
      {
        System.out.println("Finishing execution of " + Thread.currentThread());
        return;
      }
      catch (Exception e)
      {
        e.printStackTrace();
      }
    }
  }

  public void writeImageToFile(BufferedImage image) throws IOException
  {
    File file = new File(dir, "screenshot-" + counter.incrementAndGet());
    ImageIO.write(image, "JPG", file);
    System.out.println(Thread.currentThread() + 
        ": Wrote " + file.getCanonicalPath());
  }
}
share|improve this answer

What millimoose said. Maybe you could somehow try to lower the resolution of the JPEGS to give you a little more memory, but you're probably going to have to use a video codec. You can also try creating a handler to record only when you move the mouse, or type if you are really intent on recording in JPEG.

share|improve this answer
    
The idea of codecs sounds promising but I have never dealt with them in Java or any other language, if you could give me any links/pointers that would be a great help! If I went down the codec route, would I still be using a Robot or would I need to use something different? Finally, I plan on distributing this application to novice users (I'm also considering webstart) so I would really need everything to be contained within the application without the user needing to install additional software on their computer. Thanks for your continued help! –  camerongray Jul 5 '12 at 22:22
    
I'm sorry, I haven't really worked with codecs so I don't know much about them. I just know that taking screen shots and turning them into videos is extremely memory intensive. I'd suggest reading up on them and then asking a new question about them. –  Steven Morad Jul 5 '12 at 22:30

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