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Simply put, I have these tables.

Planning: 
  Date | Machine | Product | PlanningParts

OKParts: 
  Date | Machine | Product | OKParts

Scrap: 
  Date | Machine | Product | ScrapParts

Trials: 
  Date | Machine | Product | TrialParts

Breakdowns: 
  Date | Machine | Product | Minutes

These tables can have two or more records for a same [Date | Machine | Product], they are not unique columns. What is the best SQL Code(SQLite or SQL Server) to get this output?

Output:
  Date | Machine | Product | Planning | OKParts | ScrapParts | TrialParts | Minutes

Edit: In the output, i need one line per [Date,Machine,Product] and the rest of the columns have to be the SUM (I don't speak english, Sorry)

Eidted: Example: (I would not put the table "Trials" to make it shorter)

Planning:
     Date    | Machine | Product | PlanningParts
     1/6/12  |  Blower | A001    | 100
     2/6/12  |  Blower | A002    | 100
     2/6/12  | Assembly| B001    | 50

OKParts:
     Date   | Machine | Product  | OKParts
     1/6/12 | Blower  | A001     | 50
     1/6/12 | Blower  | A001     | 20
     1/6/12 | Blower  | A002     | 100

Scrap:
     Date   | Machine | Product  | ScrapParts | Reason
     1/6/12 | Blower  | A001     | 5          | Low Weight
     1/6/12 | Blower  | A001     | 3          | High Weight
     2/6/12 | Assembly| B001     | 4          | Bad Cut

Breakdowns
     Date   | Machine | Product  | Minutes    | Reason
     1/6/12 | Blower  | A001     | 100        | Manteinance
     1/6/12 | Blower  | A001     | 20         | Manteinance
     2/6/12 | Assembly| B001     | 100        | Quality approval


   OUTPUT:
         Date   | Machine | Product  | Planning | OKParts | ScrapParts | Breakdowns
         1/6/12 | Blower  | A001     | 100      | 70      | 8          | 120
         1/6/12 | Blower  | A002     | 100      | 100     | 0          | 0
         2/6/12 | Assembly| B001     | 50       | 0       | 4          | 100
share|improve this question
    
Please show sample data (including a few rows where there are multiple values contributing to a single SUM) and desired results. This way, we don't have to ask 15 follow-up questions about the results, or guess about the query you need. If you show sample data and desired results, we can test and verify solutions before showing them to you and having you reject them because your requirements weren't clear. –  Aaron Bertrand Jul 5 '12 at 22:38
    
If there is a record in one table, will the same {Date,Machine,Product} always have at least one record in all the other tables? Or could they sometimes have 0 records for that {Date,Machine,Product}? And/or is there one table that always has at least one record for that {Date,Machine,Product}? –  MatBailie Jul 5 '12 at 22:39
    
Please read: dba.blogoverflow.com/2012/06/help-us-help-you –  Aaron Bertrand Jul 5 '12 at 23:03
    
@Aaron Bertrand - Excuse me, I had not read the first comment –  leinho Jul 5 '12 at 23:44
    
@Dems - They sometimes have 0 records for that {Date,Machine,Product} –  leinho Jul 5 '12 at 23:45

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Create a CTE unioning all the tables into one, then using the SUM aggrigate function, add up the columns for each Date, Machine, Product group. A bit like this (not tested):

WITH AllParts AS (
SELECT Date, Machine, Product, PlanningParts, NULL AS OKParts, NULL AS ScrapParts, NULL AS TrialParts, NULL AS Breakdowns
FROM Planning
UNION ALL
SELECT Date, Machine, Product,NULL AS PlanningParts, OKParts, NULL AS ScrapParts, NULL AS TrialParts, NULL AS Breakdowns
FROM OKParts
UNION ALL
SELECT Date, Machine, Product,NULL AS PlanningParts, NULL AS OKParts, ScrapParts, NULL AS TrialParts, NULL AS Breakdowns
FROM Scrap
UNION ALL
SELECT Date, Machine, Product,NULL AS PlanningParts, NULL AS OKParts, NULL AS ScrapParts, TrialParts, NULL AS Breakdowns
FROM Trials
UNION ALL
SELECT Date, Machine, Product,NULL AS PlanningParts, NULL AS OKParts, NULL AS ScrapParts, TrialParts, Breakdowns
FROM BreakDowns
)
SELECT
Date, Machine, Product, SUM(OKParts) AS OKParts, SUM(ScrapParts) AS ScrapParts, SUM(TrialParts) AS TrialParts, SUM(BreakDowns) AS Breakdowns
FROM AllParts
GROUP BY Date, Machine, Product
share|improve this answer
    
Not the easiest to read, but certainly works. And doesn't have the duplication causing problems of the JOIN version. –  MatBailie Jul 5 '12 at 22:41
    
That's what I have already, but I see the code and it looks pretty dirty. There must be a more efficient way of doing –  leinho Jul 5 '12 at 22:43
    
Obviously aliasing is not required for all the unions (only the top one) but I wrote it like this to make it clearer what was going on. Removing the unnecessary aliases would make it a bit easier to read! This is the most efficient way I could think of doing this seeing as UNION ALLs require very little work. –  jaypeagi Jul 5 '12 at 22:43
1  
@leinho come on now, don't blame the tool because your design is not optimal or because your query requirements are not geared to your design or vice versa. –  Aaron Bertrand Jul 5 '12 at 22:56
1  
@leinho - Do all your tables have indexes on {Date,Machine,Product} as a single composite index? –  MatBailie Jul 6 '12 at 7:39

I'd be interested to see if SUMming after the UNION performs as well as this query that SUMs first:

WITH Vals AS (
   SELECT Date, Machine, Product, 'PlanningParts' Which, Sum(PlanningParts) Value FROM Planning GROUP BY Date, Machine, Product
   UNION ALL SELECT Date, Machine, Product, 'OKParts', Sum(OKParts) FROM OKParts GROUP BY Date, Machine, Product
   UNION ALL SELECT Date, Machine, Product, 'ScrapParts', Sum(ScrapParts) FROM Scrap GROUP BY Date, Machine, Product
   UNION ALL SELECT Date, Machine, Product, 'TrialParts', Sum(TrialParts) FROM Trials GROUP BY Date, Machine, Product
   UNION ALL SELECT Date, Machine, Product, 'Minutes', Sum(Minutes) FROM Breakdowns GROUP BY Date, Machine, Product
)
SELECT *
FROM Vals
PIVOT (Max(Value) FOR Which IN (PlanningParts, OKParts, ScrapParts, TrialParts, Minutes)) P;

Yeah, it's painful, but that's what you get from the given database design. Refactoring these 5 tables into one table, with views replacing these tables having instead-of triggers could be viable.

Note: PIVOT is for SQL Server 2005 and up. But you don't even need PIVOT:

WITH Vals AS (
   SELECT Date, Machine, Product, 'PlanningParts' Which, Sum(PlanningParts) Value FROM Planning GROUP BY Date, Machine, Product
   UNION ALL SELECT Date, Machine, Product, 'OKParts', Sum(OKParts) FROM OKParts GROUP BY Date, Machine, Product
   UNION ALL SELECT Date, Machine, Product, 'ScrapParts', Sum(ScrapParts) FROM Scrap GROUP BY Date, Machine, Product
   UNION ALL SELECT Date, Machine, Product, 'TrialParts', Sum(TrialParts) FROM Trials GROUP BY Date, Machine, Product
   UNION ALL SELECT Date, Machine, Product, 'Minutes', Sum(Minutes) FROM Breakdowns GROUP BY Date, Machine, Product
)
SELECT
   Date, Machine, Product,
   Sum(CASE Which WHEN 'PlanningParts' THEN Value END) PlanningParts,
   Sum(CASE Which WHEN 'OKParts' THEN Value END) OKParts,
   Sum(CASE Which WHEN 'ScrapParts' THEN Value END) ScrapParts,
   Sum(CASE Which WHEN 'TrialParts' THEN Value END) TrialParts,
   Sum(CASE Which WHEN 'Minutes' THEN Value END) Minutes
FROM Vals;

Switching the text Which values to integers will probably yield a speed improvement.

In regards to my comment/question about a table with a distinct list of the Date, Machine, Product values that are in your tables, this query would provide such a list. This won't perform well, but it should give you the idea.

WITH DistinctKeys AS ( --wishing we had this as a real table
   SELECT Date, Machine, Product FROM Planning
   UNION SELECT Date, Machine, Product FROM OKParts
   UNION SELECT Date, Machine, Product FROM Scrap
   UNION SELECT Date, Machine, Product FROM Trials
   UNION SELECT Date, Machine, Product FROM Breakdown
) -- because then we could do this:
SELECT
   K.Date, K.Machine, K.Part,
   (SELECT Sum(PlanningParts) FROM Planning X ON EXISTS (SELECT K.* INTERSECT SELECT X.Date, X.Machine, X.Product) PlanningParts
   (SELECT Sum(OKParts) FROM OKParts X ON EXISTS (SELECT K.* INTERSECT SELECT X.Date, X.Machine, X.Product) OKParts
   (SELECT Sum(ScrapParts) FROM Scrap X ON EXISTS (SELECT K.* INTERSECT SELECT X.Date, X.Machine, X.Product) Scrap
   (SELECT Sum(TrialParts) FROM Trials X ON EXISTS (SELECT K.* INTERSECT SELECT X.Date, X.Machine, X.Product) TrialParts
   (SELECT Sum(Minutes) FROM Breakdown X ON EXISTS (SELECT K.* INTERSECT SELECT X.Date, X.Machine, X.Product) Minutes
FROM
   DistinctKeys K;

But frankly, the JOINs are not going to perform as well as the UNIONs previously given in my and @jaypeagi's answers.

One more thing: do NOT assume what the performance is going to be of a query. Even experts check execution plans and collect real IO and CPU statistics to determine this information. Your worries about NULLs reducing performance are likely completely unfounded.

If you have good indexes on your tables on [Date, Machine, Product] then you will probably get reasonably good performance out of the UNION methods.

share|improve this answer
    
Better!, Did not know the keyword "PIVOT". But I still like watching dirty. You got any idea how to make the model better?. I commented that several of these tables have more columns. Example: Scrap and Breakdowns table has one column more, "Reason", so you can have: Scrap: 1/6/12 | Blower | Tank | 5 | Under Weight 1/6/12 | Blower | Tank | 3 | Weight High –  leinho Jul 5 '12 at 23:18
    
If you are using the supertype/subtype pattern where your tables have different columns even though they basically represent the same kinds of things, then perhaps your database structure is okay. If the number of columns is not really that much different, then putting everything in the same table may still be best, just leaving columns NULL when they don't apply to the type of item. –  ErikE Jul 5 '12 at 23:20
    
@leinho Do you have a table with a distinct list of the Date, Machine, and Product values that will be found in these 5 tables? –  ErikE Jul 5 '12 at 23:21
    
sorry, i don't understand the question. There is not unique columns. And in the five tables the values of Date can be any date, Machine and Product are the same JOINs in the five tables to Machines.ID AND Products.ID (Other two tables) . Sorry about my english –  leinho Jul 5 '12 at 23:28
    
@leinho - We want to know how to get a list of the {Date,Machine,Prodcut}s that exist in your data. You say that each table could have 0 records for a {Date,Machine,Product} that exists in another table. It's normal practice in such cases to have a Dimension Table that has exactly one record for each {Date,Machine,Product}. This can make queries and constraints much easier to implement. –  MatBailie Jul 6 '12 at 7:42

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