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I have some embedded code that writes commands to a memory address to control a peripherial like so:

void intelStartEraseBlock(uint16_t *wordAddress) {
  *wordAddress =  0x20;  //block erase
  *wordAddress =  0xD0;  //block erase confirm
}

I suspect that the optimizer is skipping the first assignment. Is this a job for volatile? or is there a better solution...

Note: this is legacy api code, so I don't plan of refactoring much. I am looking for a 'local' fix here.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Yes, just declare wordAddress as a pointer to volatile data:

void intelStartEraseBlock(volatile uint16_t *wordAddress) {
   ...
}

The volatile keyword tells the compiler that the semantics have to match up with the abstract virtual machine specified by the C language -- in other words, every time you write to a volatile variable, the code has to actually write to memory, and every time you read from a volatile variable, the code has to actually read from memory.

The compiler is not allowed to optimize away these reads and writes, even if it thinks they are redundant.

Note that it must be the pointed-to data which is declared volatile, not the pointer itself. Like the const keyword, it makes a big difference. Since wordAddress is itself a variable on the stack, we don't care of reads/writes of it actually go out to the stack memory, but we do care that the memory it points to (presumably some type of memory-mapped I/O) is actually read/written.

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so uint16_t volatile * wordAddress would be wrong? –  Rhythmic Fistman Jul 6 '12 at 9:02
    
No, uint16_t volatile* is identical to volatile uint16_t* (just like const char* is identical to char const*. It is uint16_t * volatile which is wrong -- that declares a volatile pointer to non-volatile data. –  Adam Rosenfield Jul 6 '12 at 14:21
    
whoa! I get it now. seems funny that qualifiers and types can commute - you almost need brackets. –  Rhythmic Fistman Jul 6 '12 at 16:26

That's exactly why the volatile keyword was created. This is the classical example of its usage.

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Unless your operating system provides some other mechanism for doing this kind of thing then yes, volatile is a good solution.

void intelStartEraseBlock(volatile uint16_t *wordAddress) {
  *wordAddress =  0x20;  //block erase
  *wordAddress =  0xD0;  //block erase confirm
}
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