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Thanks for reading this thread. I'm relatively new to R so this question might seem stupid.

So, I have a data set on product prices. It is a 240 by 1,000 matrix. Each column represents a unique product and each row gives price info of the 1,000 at a specific month. I'm trying to re-sample the data set and get a new matrix of the same dimensions.

  • My data is saved as "data"

  • I would want to save the bootstrapped results in "newdata", which is an empty 240x1,000 matrix

Here's my code:

for (month in 1:num.months)
{  
  for (n in 1:num.products)
  {
    newdata[month, n] <- mean(sample(data[month, ], 
                                size = num.productss,
                     replace = TRUE));
  }
 }

This works but the For Loops make things really slow. It would be great if someone can point out how I could improve the speed by using apply, sapply, tapply, and etc. Thanks.

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1  
Have you searched for a similar question on SO or anywhere? –  Seth Jul 5 '12 at 22:31
    
what are num.months and num.products? the dimensions of the matrix? –  Chase Jul 5 '12 at 22:34
1  
Pretty much all you need to know is here: Is R's apply family more than syntactic sugar (Or maybe not all, but more than enough to get you started...) –  Matt Parker Jul 5 '12 at 22:38
1  
have you looked at package boot? statmethods.net/advstats/bootstrapping.html –  Chase Jul 5 '12 at 22:39
1  
Are you really intending to replace each value in the matrix with the average of values from that row, sampled with replacement? I'm not sure what that will accomplish, but I certainly wouldn't call it bootstrapping, FWIW. –  joran Jul 5 '12 at 22:41
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1 Answer 1

I suggest you try and look at the bootstrap functions and packages already available in R before creating your own sampling method.

However, this will give a list, each element a matrix sampled from the original. Timings included:

> m = matrix(rnorm(24000),nrow=1000,ncol=24)
> nbootstrap = 100
> 
> system.time((mboot = lapply(1:nbootstrap, function(i)
+   {
+    m[sample(1:nrow(m),replace=T),]
+ })))
   user  system elapsed 
   0.27    0.00    0.26 

> m = matrix(rnorm(24000),nrow=1000,ncol=24)
> nbootstrap = 1000
> 
> system.time((mboot = lapply(1:nbootstrap, function(i)
+   {
+    m[sample(1:nrow(m),replace=T),]
+ })))
   user  system elapsed 
   1.45    0.03    1.59 

> m = matrix(rnorm(240000),nrow=1000,ncol=240)
> nbootstrap = 100
> 
> system.time((mboot = lapply(1:nbootstrap, function(i)
+   {
+    m[sample(1:nrow(m),replace=T),]
+ })))
   user  system elapsed 
   0.97    0.05    1.02 

> m = matrix(rnorm(240000),nrow=1000,ncol=240)
> nbootstrap = 1000
> 
> system.time((mboot = lapply(1:nbootstrap, function(i)
+   {
+    m[sample(1:nrow(m),replace=T),]
+ })))
   user  system elapsed 
   6.60    1.20    7.97 
share|improve this answer
    
Are you sure that you are offering effective assistance by selecting a random set of rows? Each row was supposedly a separate product. –  BondedDust Jul 6 '12 at 4:02
    
I had thought the columns were the products, and the rows were the prices? If I got that wrong, sorry. –  Davy Kavanagh Jul 6 '12 at 8:14
    
You read it correctly. My error. My only remaining concern is whether it was requested that the time slots be selected en bloc or randomized within product –  BondedDust Jul 6 '12 at 11:59
    
Then the entries in each row might not contain the time matched pricings. Perhaps this is desirable, but I thought that it would be bad. Now that I think about it, for bootstrapping, I suppose you want truely random, and what I have above wouldn't be random. so yeah, perhaps a nested lapply or something? –  Davy Kavanagh Jul 6 '12 at 12:06
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