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I am having problems figuring out why IE8 doesn't like this:

//get all checked values from the checkboxes with the option_checkbox class
var values = $j('input:checkbox:checked.option_checkbox').map(function () { return this.value; }).get();
if (values.length>0){
  for (x in values){
    if(values[x].match("v")){ // <--this line causes a javascript error in IE8
      //do something here
    }
  }
}

I get this error: "Object does not support this property or method"

I am thinking I should do some other sort of validation to verify type as perhaps map() and get() are not returning what I expect (a string with the value of that particular checkbox).

Any advice?

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1  
"Any advice?" - Iterate over an array with a standard for loop rather than a for..in. You mention not being certain that map() and get() are returning strings - add console.log(values[x]) in the loop and see what you get. (Or even alert(values[x]).) –  nnnnnn Jul 5 '12 at 22:46
1  
If you're using jquery, you might as well use it well. Don't first create an array and then loop over it with a for. Use jquery: $j('..').filter(function() { return /^v$/.test(this.value); }).each(..) –  Rudie Jul 5 '12 at 22:49
    
Thanks everyone for the tips and help. I switched it to each in combination with indexOf and now it works in older IE version as well without fail :) –  scott Jul 6 '12 at 13:45

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Use indexOf, it's negligibly faster:

if(values[x].indexOf("v") > -1) { /* ... */ }
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1  
I prefer !== -1 :D –  TheZ Jul 5 '12 at 22:31
1  
!== is useless in this case, because indexOf always returns an int. –  Rudie Jul 5 '12 at 22:50
    
@TheZ just delete the comment and we'll forget all this ever happened ... –  alexfreiria Jul 5 '12 at 23:00
    
@Rudie What are you all talking about? I meant use != or !==, just not > .... sorry if my indiscriminate use of the non-type-casting version tripped you up :O –  TheZ Jul 5 '12 at 23:02
    
@TheZ who cares?! that is just style, what is your point? –  alexfreiria Jul 5 '12 at 23:03

try this instead:

values[x].match(/v/);
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