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Suppose that I compiled a dynamic library (Windows DLL and/or Linux shared object file, .so) in debug mode for use by a client application that links to it dynamically. My source code is available to the client application developer.

I need some clarification regarding the following debugging scenario. I've always understood/assumed that in order for the client application to debug into my library (for e.g. in order for a client application developer to step into my source code while debugging, say using F10 in MS VC++), that they would have to have actually built a local copy of my libraries themselves (with access to my source code), or atleast have local access to my source code without having built it (not sure if that would suffice?).

Am I right on this? In other words, I think it is not merely enough to provide libraries with debugging symbols (PDB files in MS VC++) if the client application is linking dynamically to my application which has itself been built dynamically. Appreciate if anyone can help sort this out for me? How about the situation in Linux? My understanding again is the same as the above. Now if I had compiled a static library (Windows LIB and/or Linux library .a); my understanding is that the they then don't need to have a locally build copy of my source code (I haven't tried this one out yet)?

Is/are my premise(s) correct? If not, can someone kindly provide some detailed explanation preferably with an example? Thanks for your input.

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For VC++, debug DLL + matching PDB + matching source is all you need. The hard part is getting them all to match ;-) Also, it works more smoothly if the source files are at the same path as when the DLL was compiled, but VS is also perfectly capable of prompting you to browse to the source manually if you have it. –  Cameron Jul 6 '12 at 1:13
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You may wish to try readelf --debug-dump on your object files on Linux to see some of the information available. I hope this provides you wish some information.. (You may do better to re-focus this question on one platform and ask another question about the other platform...) –  sarnold Jul 6 '12 at 1:30
    
Thanks @Cameron: That was the answer I was hoping to hear. You can post it as an answer if you like. –  squashed.bugaboo Jul 6 '12 at 17:18
    
Thanks @Sarnold: Noted. –  squashed.bugaboo Jul 6 '12 at 17:18

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

As requested, here's my comment as an answer. Since it only addresses the Windows side of things, anybody who has the Linux (or Mac!) part of the answer is free to edit it in (I've marked this as a community wiki answer).


For VC++, the debug build DLL + matching PDB + matching source is all you need. The hard part is getting them all to match ;-)

Also, it works more smoothly if the source files are at the same path as when the DLL was compiled, but Visual Studio is also perfectly capable of prompting you to browse to the source manually if you have it.

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I have more experience with Windows than linux. But I would think the concept is similar.

if the client application is linking dynamically to my application which has itself been built dynamically.

I'm not quite sure if I understand "building dynamically". You might be confused with the dynamic aspect of dll? dll is linked at runtime (not build time) to allow a part of component to be deployed without a full app. For example, an app on Windows that rely on a dll provided by the OS are not impacted when Windows updates that dll as long as the interface is maintained. The only difference between a dll and exe is that dll's entry function is dllmain as opposed to main in exe.

(The only "dynamic build" concept I can think of is building templated classes. But I don't think that's what you mean here.)

Hence, debugging a .dll isn't different from debugging a .exe, it's just that .dll is a separate binary file from the executable. All the source code provide is allowing debugger to align the stepping with lines in source code. When source code is not available, then debugger can still step through assembly code with symbols.

When situation doesn't allow, then developers who are good at reading assembly code can do debugging with only symbols and no source code.

You can usually build a binary with optimized option, then compiler might optimize the assembly code so much that source code alignment in the debugger might not be possible. This usually happens with released code. In those cases when you step through the code, you sometimes see the line or condition jumps that are seemingly different from what you would expect. There is the same on .exe, .exe with libs, or .dll. This is probably why you thought it is always necessary to build your own binary to debug dlls?

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Thanks for the detailed response @fatshu. Yes, we can build (create) shared (dynamic) libraries. An example on Linux can be found here: yolinux.com/TUTORIALS/LibraryArchives-StaticAndDynamic.html –  squashed.bugaboo Jul 6 '12 at 17:25
    
That's what I meant. You can build a dynamic library that is dynamic at run time, but you are not building dynamically. I was trying to be precise of the concept. :) –  fatshu Jul 6 '12 at 18:39

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