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this is how I start a background task when application goes background ,

   void applicationDidEnterBackground:(UIApplication *)application
{
    btId = UIBackgroundTaskInvalid;
    UIApplication* cuiApplication = [UIApplication sharedApplication];

    void (^backgroundTimeRemainingExtenderHandler)() = ^() {

        NSTimeInterval timeRemaining1 = [cuiApplication backgroundTimeRemaining];

        if(btId != UIBackgroundTaskInvalid){
            [proximityEngine StopEngine];
            [cuiApplication endBackgroundTask:btId];
            btId = UIBackgroundTaskInvalid;
        }
    };

    btId= [cuiApplication beginBackgroundTaskWithExpirationHandler:backgroundTimeRemainingExtenderHandler];

    if(bgmanager != nil){
        [bgmanager BeginBackgroundTaskMainLoop];
    } 
}

My problem is that when my background task calls :

NSURLConnection sendSynchronousRequest

The expiration block is being called even though there is more time remaning , how can I prevent this ?

Regards ,

James

EDIT :

After reading the answer below : I still have 596 seconds left when querying the amount of time left and yet still IOS calls the expiration block handler.

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2 Answers 2

beginBackgroundTaskWithExpirationHandler: is the means by which apps request a little extra background time to do some tidying up as a result of going into the background. However iOS reserves the right to decide how much time it will offer you, if any at all, and to kill your process if you fail to end within the required amount of time.

You don't get to execute in the background indefinitely and you don't get to pick your own time limit. You can query what you've been allocated via backgroundTimeRemaining but that's pretty much the full extent.

Per the documentation the handler is called "shortly before the application’s remaining background time reaches 0". So you should expect backgroundTimeRemaining not quite to be zero.

That being said, if your URL connection hasn't yet completed then you're just meant to note somewhere that it didn't complete and deal with the error next time you come back from the background, usually by trying again. That's what your expiration handler should do, and it needs to do it fast.

The extra time allotted to your app is non-negotiable however.

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I still have 596 seconds left when querying the amount of time left and yet still IOS calls the expiration block handler. It happens right after the syncsend finishes .... –  James Roeiter Jul 6 '12 at 10:08
up vote 1 down vote accepted

In my particular case - which I do not quite sure why it behaved the way it behaved , I performed the task on a different thread than the beginbackgroundtask thread , after sendsync returned in that thread the backgroundtask was interrupted by the OS . When calling sendsync in the beginbackground original thread , it does not occur. Not sure if its something logical and I did something wrong or an OS bug.

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COULD UPVOTE MILLION TIMES!! SAVED MY LIFE!!! THANKS!!! –  Raphael Ayres May 22 at 7:54
    
I think what is going on is that since your app is in Background, all it´s threads are currently asleep or non existant... When you get a call from the OS, the app awakes with a single background thread... It will probably not allow you to open other threads as this could go forever, so it just triggers the expiration handler. –  Raphael Ayres May 22 at 7:58

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