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I'm trying to produce some fading edges on a UIScrollView with a fairly complex hierarchy, with lengths that can be easily adjusted on scroll. This is basically the effect I'm trying to achieve (notice the fading edges):

enter image description here

The tricky parts are:

  1. The fact the background is dynamic
  2. I want the fading edges to "grow" as the user scrolls; that is, they aren't there when scrolling is not occurring, but once scrolling begins, the fade effect increases as the contentOffset increases
  3. Similar to no. 2, the fading edges should shrink down smoothly once scrolling is complete

I've gotten most of what I want using a custom CAGradientLayer that is used as the mask of the view's layer, but the problem is that it's not adequate performance-wise. I then tried toggling the mask on-demand, ie. when scrolling begins, the mask is set, and when scrolling stops, the mask is removed. This sort of worked (there were some bugs), but I later discovered that changing the mask on the fly had undefined behaviour, according to the Apple documentation. I haven't determined a CoreGraphics-based solution yet, and I'm not sure if it will be feasible or if the performance will be any better. I also can't use an image to simulate the gradient, because both the content and the background are dynamic.

This is the implementation of the custom CAGradientLayer subclass I've created:

- (id) init {
    self = [super init];
    if (self) {
        self.anchorPoint = CGPointZero;

        self.startPoint = CGPointMake(0.0, 0.5);
        self.endPoint = CGPointMake(1.0, 0.5);

        CGColorRef transluscentColor = [UIColor colorWithWhite:1.0 alpha:0.0].CGColor;
        CGColorRef opaqueColor = [UIColor colorWithWhite:1.0 alpha:1.0].CGColor;

        self.colors = [NSArray arrayWithObjects:
                       (id)opaqueColor,
                       (id)transluscentColor, 
                       (id)opaqueColor, 
                       (id)opaqueColor,
                       (id)transluscentColor,
                       (id)opaqueColor, nil];
        self.locations = [NSArray arrayWithObjects:
                          [NSNumber numberWithFloat:0.0f],
                          [NSNumber numberWithFloat:0.0f],
                          [NSNumber numberWithFloat:0.0f],
                          [NSNumber numberWithFloat:1.0f],
                          [NSNumber numberWithFloat:1.0f],
                          [NSNumber numberWithFloat:1.0f], nil];
    }

    return self;
}

- (void) setAbsoluteStartPoint:(CGPoint)startPoint endPoint:(CGPoint)endPoint {
    [CATransaction begin];
    [CATransaction setDisableActions:YES];
    self.startPoint = CGPointMake(startPoint.x / self.bounds.size.width, startPoint.y / self.bounds.size.height);
    self.endPoint = CGPointMake(endPoint.x / self.bounds.size.width, endPoint.y / self.bounds.size.height);
    [CATransaction commit];
}

- (void) setGradientStartLength:(CGFloat)startLength endLength:(CGFloat)endLength animated:(BOOL)animated {
    CGFloat deltaX = (self.endPoint.x - self.startPoint.x);
    CGFloat deltaY = (self.endPoint.y - self.startPoint.y);

    // use the side whose change is largest as our base length
    CGFloat sideLength = (deltaX > deltaY ? self.bounds.size.width * deltaX : self.bounds.size.height * deltaY);

    CGFloat startRatio = MAX((startLength / sideLength), 0.0f);
    CGFloat endRatio = 1.0f - MAX((endLength / sideLength), 0.0f);

    NSArray *locations = [NSArray arrayWithObjects:
                          [NSNumber numberWithFloat:0.0f],
                          [NSNumber numberWithFloat:0.0f],
                          [NSNumber numberWithFloat:startRatio],
                          [NSNumber numberWithFloat:endRatio],
                          [NSNumber numberWithFloat:1.0f],
                          [NSNumber numberWithFloat:1.0f], nil];

    [CATransaction begin];
    if (animated) {
        [CATransaction setAnimationDuration:0.5];
        [CATransaction setAnimationTimingFunction:[CAMediaTimingFunction functionWithName:kCAMediaTimingFunctionEaseIn]];
    }
    else {
        [CATransaction setDisableActions:YES];
    }

    self.locations = locations;
    [CATransaction commit];
}

When used with my UIScrollView, I basically just adjust the layer's position to match the contentOffset, and then adjust the size using setGradientStartLength:endLength:animated: without animation (animation doesn't slow things down much though).

Like I said, this will do what I want, but not at the level of performance I need (the framerate dips from 60fps to around 30 with it used as the scroll view's mask). And I haven't figured out a good way to do this without using the mask property, which I assume is the way I'll have to do it.

My guess is that this is achievable using similar code as above, but using my layer as a sublayer instead of the view's mask. But I haven't determined how to add the fade effect like this when the layer is used as a sublayer, and I haven't seen any examples of anyone else having done the same.

Can anyone point me in the right direction here? I find Apple's documentation on these things is very limited.

share|improve this question
    
Can you post a picture of the effect you're trying to achieve? May prompt some suggestions. –  idz Jul 7 '12 at 3:17
    
Sure. I added an image and a better description of the effect. –  Andrew R. Jul 9 '12 at 1:35
    
Did you solve it? –  Palimondo May 17 '13 at 10:35

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