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Usually when we call MPI_Bcast, the root must be decided. But now I have an application that does not care who will broadcast the message. It means the node that will broadcast the message is random, but once the message is broadcasted, a global variable must be consistent. My understanding is that since MPI_Bcast is a collective function, all nodes need to call it but the order may be different. So who arrives at MPI_Bcast first, who will broadcast the message to others. I ran the following code with 3 nodes, I think if node 1 (rank==1) arrives at MPI_Bcast first, it will send the local_count value (1) to other nodes,and then all nodes update global_count with the same local_count, so one of my expected result is (the output order does not matter)
node 0, global count is 1
node 1, global count is 1
node 2, global count is 1

But the the actual result is always (the output order does not matter):
node 1, global count is 1
node 0, global count is 0
node 2, global count is 2

This result is exactly the same as the code without MPI_Bcast. So is there anything wrong with my understanding of MPI_Bcast or my code. Thanks.

#include <mpi.h>
#include <stdio.h>

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{   

    int rank, size;
    int local_count, global_count;
    MPI_Init(&argc, &argv);
    MPI_Comm_rank(MPI_COMM_WORLD, &rank);
    MPI_Comm_size(MPI_COMM_WORLD, &size);

    global_count = 0;
    local_count = rank;

    MPI_Bcast(&local_count, 1, MPI_INT, rank, MPI_COMM_WORLD);
    global_count += local_count;

    printf("node %d, global count is: %d\n", rank, global_count);
    MPI_Finalize();
}

The code is a simplified case. In my application, there are some computations before MPI_Bcast and I don't know who will finish the computation first. Whenever a node comes to MPI_Bcast point, it needs to broadcast its own computation result local variable and all nodes update the global variable. So all nodes need to broadcast a message but we don't know the order. How to implement this idea?

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See my answer again. It looks like you need MPI_Allreduce. –  Hristo Iliev Jul 6 '12 at 14:59
    
Well, Allreduce will reduce all local variables in all nodes, but at one time I can only update the global variable with one local variable. I have solved my problem now, but thanks anyway. –  silence_lamb Jul 6 '12 at 15:52

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Normally what you have written will lead to deadlock. In a typical MPI_Bcast case the process with rank root sends its data to all other processes in the comunicator. You need to specify the same root rank in those receiving processes so they know whom to "listen" to. This is an oversimplified description since usually hierarchial broadcast is used in orderto reduce the total operation time but with three processes this hierarchial implementation reduces to the very simple linear one. In your case process with rank 0 will try to send the same message to both processes 1 and 2. In the same time process 1 would not receive that message but instead will try to send its one to processes 0 and 2. Process 2 will also be trying to send to 0 and 1. In the end every process will be sending messages that no other process will be willing to receive. This is an almost sure recipe for distaster.

Why your program doesn't hang? Because messages being sent are very small, only one MPI_INT element and also the number of processes is small, thus those sends are all being buffered internally by the MPI library in every process - they never reach their destinations but nevertheless the calls made internally by MPI_Bcast do not block and your code gets back execution control although the operation is still in progress. This is undefined behaviour since the MPI library is not required to buffer anything by the standard - some implementations might buffer, others might not.

If you are trying to compute the sum of all local_count variables in all processes, then just use MPI_Allreduce. Replace this:

global_count = 0;
local_count = rank;

MPI_Bcast(&local_count, 1, MPI_INT, rank, MPI_COMM_WORLD);
global_count += local_count;

with this:

local_count = rank;
MPI_Allreduce(&local_count, &global_count, 1, MPI_INT, MPI_SUM, MPI_COMM_WORLD);
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If I add some computations before MPI_Bcast and the workload is different for every node, the time they arrives at MPI_Bcast is different, there will be no conflict. e.g. if rank 0 arrvies first, it sends 0 to processes 1 and 2, then rank 1 arrives, it sends 1 to processes 0 and 2, finally rank 2 arrives and it sends 2 to processes 0 and 1. –  silence_lamb Jul 6 '12 at 14:46
1  
Read once again carefully what I have written. It is irrelevant when processes arrive at the MPI_Bcast() statement. –  Hristo Iliev Jul 6 '12 at 14:50
    
OK, I got it. When the later node comes to MPI_Bcast, on the one hand, it needs to receive the data from earlier node, on ther other hand, it needs to broadcast the data to other nodes. These two operations may wait for each other to complete and so deadlock may happen. Thanks very much. –  silence_lamb Jul 6 '12 at 15:45

The correct usage of MPI_BCast is that all processes call the function with the same root. Even if you don't care about who the broadcaster is, all the processes must call the function with the same rank to listen to the broadcaster. In your code, each process are calling MPI_BCast with their own rank and all different from each other.

I haven't look at the standard document, but it is likely that you trigger undefined behavior by calling MPI_BCast with different ranks.

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Thanks for correcting me. Now there are some computations before MPI_Bcast and I don't know who will finish the computation first. Whenever a node comes to MPI_Bcast point, it needs to broadcast its own computation result local variable and all nodes update the global variable. So all nodes need to broadcast a message but we don't know the order. Do you know how to implement this idea? I haven't found anything on the Internet. Thanks. –  silence_lamb Jul 6 '12 at 14:00
    
@silence_lamb: You may want to have a look at Hristo Iliev's answer. I don't know what you want to do, but usually, you will 1) distribute work so that everyone has just enough data to work 2) work on the data 3) aggregate the data (reduce or collect). It's a bit weird to synchronize between the processes midway. –  nhahtdh Jul 6 '12 at 15:20

from the openmpi docs

"MPI_Bcast broadcasts a message from the process with rank root to all processes of the group, itself included. It is called by all members of group using the same arguments for comm, root. On return, the contents of root’s communication buffer has been copied to all processes. "

calling it might from ranks != root might cause some problems

a safer way is to hard code your own broadcast function and call that

its basically a for loop and a mpi_send command and shouldn't be to difficult to implement your self

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A real broadcast implementation is not just a for loop with MPI_Send (also, the send/receive should probably be non-blocking). Instead, a tree is usually used. An optimized MPI implementation can also take advantage of hardware multicast when it is available. So, a for loop will work, but it is likely to be much slower than an optimized implementation. –  Greg Inozemtsev Jul 6 '12 at 13:56
    
Yes, but in my application, I don't know who will broadcast the message, because who will come to MPI_Bcast first is random. Every node needs to broadcast its message but we don't know the order. I have thought for a long time but still don't know how to implement this idea. –  silence_lamb Jul 6 '12 at 14:06

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