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I have created a method that accept variadic arguments like

- (NSDictionary *) getImagePixelsAtLocation: (int) locations,...NS_REQUIRES_NIL_TERMINATION

but when I send message to this class method, the value of locations variable in called method is 0 (it does not matter how many arguments I pass).

The method receives scalar data types. My question is: Can we pass scalar variable to a method as variadic arguments? If yes, what am I doing wrong?

The method definition is:

- (NSDictionary *) getImagePixelsAtLocation: (int) pixel1,...
{
    NSMutableDictionary *dict = [NSMutableDictionary dictionary];
    va_list args;
    va_start(args, pixel1);

    //processing logic


    va_end(args);
} 

This is how I am sending message:

[HSImageProcessing getImagePixelsAtLocation:1,2,nil];
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Can u Please add your method declaration or full method code. –  Ani Shroff Jul 6 '12 at 4:34
    
I just tested, it works perfectly fine for me. Incidentally, passing nil to something expecting an int doesn't make much sense. –  Kevin Ballard Jul 6 '12 at 4:47
    
If you're worried about it, just change the arg type to accept NSIntegers. –  CodaFi Jul 6 '12 at 4:53
    
well. something funky going on. When I pass a pointer type variable (object) it gets received. –  iHS Jul 6 '12 at 4:59
    
How can you have nil termination with a integer? It isn't possible, sorry. –  Richard J. Ross III Jul 6 '12 at 12:27
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1 Answer

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Actually, there is one glaringly obvious flaw in your code there: when a variadic function is nil-terminated, the accepted type must be an object. You cannot compare an int to nil or NULL, or [NSNull null], which defeats the purpose of nil-termination, and effectively defeats all chances of iteration using the standard for and for-in loops. In addition, NSDictionary isn't too happy about storing non-object types, and will happily make the compiler complain. I've rewritten it to accept NSNumber*, and output a dictionary of numbers.

- (NSDictionary*) getImagePixelsAtLocation: (NSNumber*) pixel1,...
{
    NSMutableDictionary *dict = [NSMutableDictionary dictionary];
    va_list args;
    va_start(args, pixel1);

    //processing logic
    for (NSNumber* arg = pixel1; arg != nil; arg = va_arg(args, NSNumber*)) {
        [dict setObject:arg forKey:[NSString stringWithFormat:@"%i", [arg intValue]]];
    }

    va_end(args);
    return dict;
}

All it takes is a little bit of extra code on your part to get that very same call working as well:

[self getImagePixelsAtLocation:[NSNumber numberWithInt:1],[NSNumber numberWithInt:2],nil];
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And that ugly code will get cleaner in the future: [self getImagePixelsAtLocation:@1,@2,nil]. Alternately, you could do this with ints, but then you'd need to terminate with zero (or INT_MAX, or some other sentinel value of your choosing). –  rickster Jul 6 '12 at 5:19
    
Terminating with zero is dangerous as ints may be passed in that are in fact zero. In addition, zero is not nil, nil is for id types. Also, you're totally right about the literals, but I want to hold on to that ObjC 2.0 smell as long as possible before I jump into 2.1 ;P (that, and he might not have access to Xcode 4.5...) –  CodaFi Jul 6 '12 at 5:20
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