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My question is similar to this:

ASP.NET MVC 4 Minification & Background Images

Except that I want to stick with MVC's own bundling if I can. I'm having a brain crash trying to figure out what the correct pattern is for specifying style bundles such that standalone css and image sets such as jQuery UI work.

I have a typical MVC site structure with /Content/css/ which contains my base CSS such as styles.css. Within that css folder I also have subfolders such as /jquery-ui which contains its CSS file plus an /images folder. Image paths in the jQuery UI CSS are relative to that folder and I don't want to mess with them.

As I understand it, when I specify a StyleBundle I need to specify a virtual path which does not also match a real content path, because (assuming I'm ignoring routes to Content) IIS would then try to resolve that path as a physical file. So I'm specifying:

bundles.Add( 
    new StyleBundle("~/Content/styles/jquery-ui")
        .Include("~/Content/css/jquery-ui/*.css"));

rendered using:

@Styles.Render("~/Content/styles/jquery-ui")

I can see the request going out to:

http://localhost/MySite/Content/styles/jquery-ui?v=nL_6HPFtzoqrts9nwrtjq0VQFYnhMjY5EopXsK8cxmg1

This is returning the correct minified CSS response. But then the browser sends a request for a relatively linked image as:

http://localhost/MySite/Content/styles/images/ui-bg_highlight-soft_100_eeeeee_1x100.png

Which is a 404.

I understand that the last part of my URL jquery-ui is an extensionless URL, a handler for my bundle, so I can see why the relative request for the image is simply /styles/images/.

So my question is what is the correct way of handling this situation?

share|improve this question
7  
after been frustrated over and over again with the new Bundling and Minification part, I moved on to Cassete witch is now free and works way better! –  balexandre Jul 6 '12 at 4:48
2  
Thanks for the link, Cassette looks nice and I'll definitely check it out. But I want to stick with the provided approach if possible, surely this must be possible without messing with image paths in 3rd party CSS files every time a new version is released. for now I've kept my ScriptBundles (which work nicely) but reverted to plain CSS links until I get a resolution. Cheers. –  Tom Hall Jul 6 '12 at 5:05
    
Adding the likely error for SEO reasons: The controller for path '/bundles/images/blah.jpg' was not found or does not implement IController. –  Luke Puplett Jun 5 '13 at 17:55

9 Answers 9

up vote 197 down vote accepted

After much digging, I came across http://forums.asp.net/t/1774324.aspx/1.

If you define your bundle as:

bundles.Add(new StyleBundle("~/Content/css/jquery-ui/bundle")
       .Include("~/Content/css/jquery-ui/*.css"));

Where you define the bundle on the same path as the source files that made up the bundle, the relative image paths will still work. The last part of the bundle path is really the file name for that specific bundle (i.e., /bundle can be any name you like).

This will only work if you are bundling together CSS from the same folder (which I think makes sense from a bundling perspective).

Update

As per the comment below by @Hao Kung, alternatively this may now be achieved by applying a CssRewriteUrlTransformation (Change relative URL references to CSS files when bundled).

NOTE: I have not confirmed comments regarding issues with rewriting to absolute paths within a virtual directory, so this may not work for everyone (?).

bundles.Add(new StyleBundle("~/Content/css/jquery-ui/bundle")
       .Include("~/Content/css/jquery-ui/*.css", new CssRewriteUrlTransform()));
share|improve this answer
1  
Legend! Yep, that works perfectly. I have CSS at different levels but they each have their own images folders, e.g. my main site CSS is in the root CSS folder and then jquery-ui is inside that with its own images folder, so I just specify 2 bundles, one for my base CSS and one for jQuery UI - which is maybe not uber-optimal in terms of requests, but life is short. Cheers! –  Tom Hall Jul 8 '12 at 22:41
1  
Yeah unfortunately until bundling has support for rewriting embedded urls inside of the css itself, you need the virtual directory of the css bundle to match the css files before bundling. This is why the default template bundles don't have urls like ~/bundles/themes, and instead look like the directory structure: ~/content/theemes/base/css –  Hao Kung Jul 13 '12 at 22:56
1  
@HaoKung - I understand what you are saying but that doesn't explain why new StyleBundle("~/Content/css") doesn't match "~/Content/site.css", yet it still works. And if I want to add my custom CSS to that same Include method, it never resolves. Any ideas why this is? –  Kahanu Jan 22 '13 at 17:48
12  
This is now supported via ItemTransforms, .Include("~/Content/css/jquery-ui/*.css", new CssRewriteUrlTransform())); in the 1.1Beta1 should fix this issue –  Hao Kung Mar 13 '13 at 16:58
3  
new CssRewriteUrlTransform() is fine if you have a website in IIS. but if its an application or sub application this will not work, and you have to resort to defining your bundle in the same location as you CSS. –  avidenic Jul 15 at 14:57

Grinn / ThePirat solution works well.

I did not like that it new'd the Include method on bundle, and that it created temporary files in the content directory. (they ended up getting checked in, deployed, then the service wouldn't start!)

So to follow the design of Bundling, I elected to perform essentially the same code, but in an IBundleTransform implementation::

class StyleRelativePathTransform
    : IBundleTransform
{
    public StyleRelativePathTransform()
    {
    }

    public void Process(BundleContext context, BundleResponse response)
    {
        response.Content = String.Empty;

        Regex pattern = new Regex(@"url\s*\(\s*([""']?)([^:)]+)\1\s*\)", RegexOptions.IgnoreCase);
        // open each of the files
        foreach (FileInfo cssFileInfo in response.Files)
        {
            if (cssFileInfo.Exists)
            {
                // apply the RegEx to the file (to change relative paths)
                string contents = File.ReadAllText(cssFileInfo.FullName);
                MatchCollection matches = pattern.Matches(contents);
                // Ignore the file if no match 
                if (matches.Count > 0)
                {
                    string cssFilePath = cssFileInfo.DirectoryName;
                    string cssVirtualPath = context.HttpContext.RelativeFromAbsolutePath(cssFilePath);
                    foreach (Match match in matches)
                    {
                        // this is a path that is relative to the CSS file
                        string relativeToCSS = match.Groups[2].Value;
                        // combine the relative path to the cssAbsolute
                        string absoluteToUrl = Path.GetFullPath(Path.Combine(cssFilePath, relativeToCSS));

                        // make this server relative
                        string serverRelativeUrl = context.HttpContext.RelativeFromAbsolutePath(absoluteToUrl);

                        string quote = match.Groups[1].Value;
                        string replace = String.Format("url({0}{1}{0})", quote, serverRelativeUrl);
                        contents = contents.Replace(match.Groups[0].Value, replace);
                    }
                }
                // copy the result into the response.
                response.Content = String.Format("{0}\r\n{1}", response.Content, contents);
            }
        }
    }
}

And then wrapped this up in a Bundle Implemetation:

public class StyleImagePathBundle 
    : Bundle
{
    public StyleImagePathBundle(string virtualPath)
        : base(virtualPath)
    {
        base.Transforms.Add(new StyleRelativePathTransform());
        base.Transforms.Add(new CssMinify());
    }

    public StyleImagePathBundle(string virtualPath, string cdnPath)
        : base(virtualPath, cdnPath)
    {
        base.Transforms.Add(new StyleRelativePathTransform());
        base.Transforms.Add(new CssMinify());
    }
}

Sample Usage:

static void RegisterBundles(BundleCollection bundles)
{
...
    bundles.Add(new StyleImagePathBundle("~/bundles/Bootstrap")
            .Include(
                "~/Content/css/bootstrap.css",
                "~/Content/css/bootstrap-responsive.css",
                "~/Content/css/jquery.fancybox.css",
                "~/Content/css/style.css",
                "~/Content/css/error.css",
                "~/Content/validation.css"
            ));

Here is my extension method for RelativeFromAbsolutePath:

   public static string RelativeFromAbsolutePath(this HttpContextBase context, string path)
    {
        var request = context.Request;
        var applicationPath = request.PhysicalApplicationPath;
        var virtualDir = request.ApplicationPath;
        virtualDir = virtualDir == "/" ? virtualDir : (virtualDir + "/");
        return path.Replace(applicationPath, virtualDir).Replace(@"\", "/");
    }
share|improve this answer
    
This seems cleanest to me, too. Thanks. I'm voting all three of you up because it looked to be a team effort. :) –  Josh Nov 8 '12 at 18:18
    
The code as you have it now isn't working for me. I'm trying to fix it, but thought I'd let you know. The context.HttpContext.RelativeFromAbsolutePath method doesn't exist. Also, if the url path starts with a "/" (making it absolute), your path combining logic is off. –  Josh Nov 8 '12 at 18:27
    
@Josh - Just added the declaration for RelativeFromAbsolutePath to the answer. I have been always using "~/... for all the CSS File names so there is no ambiguity –  AcidPAT Nov 16 '12 at 19:05
    
Thanks @AcidPAT. I ran into the similar issues with my solution when deploying. If I wanted to make a change to a single CSS file without re-publishing I'd have to restart the whole app so it would regenerate the .bundle files. –  Grinn Dec 4 '12 at 21:40
2  
@AcidPAT great work. The logic failed if the url had a querystring (some 3rd party libraries add it, like FontAwesome for its .woff reference.) It's an easy fix though. One can adjust the Regex or fix relativeToCSS before calling Path.GetFullPath(). –  sergiopereira Feb 24 '13 at 21:37

Better yet (IMHO) implement a custom Bundle that fixes the image paths. I wrote one for my app.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using IO = System.IO;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text.RegularExpressions;
using System.Web;
using System.Web.Optimization;

...

public class StyleImagePathBundle : Bundle
{
    public StyleImagePathBundle(string virtualPath)
        : base(virtualPath, new IBundleTransform[1]
      {
        (IBundleTransform) new CssMinify()
      })
    {
    }

    public StyleImagePathBundle(string virtualPath, string cdnPath)
        : base(virtualPath, cdnPath, new IBundleTransform[1]
      {
        (IBundleTransform) new CssMinify()
      })
    {
    }

    public new Bundle Include(params string[] virtualPaths)
    {
        if (HttpContext.Current.IsDebuggingEnabled)
        {
            // Debugging. Bundling will not occur so act normal and no one gets hurt.
            base.Include(virtualPaths.ToArray());
            return this;
        }

        // In production mode so CSS will be bundled. Correct image paths.
        var bundlePaths = new List<string>();
        var svr = HttpContext.Current.Server;
        foreach (var path in virtualPaths)
        {
            var pattern = new Regex(@"url\s*\(\s*([""']?)([^:)]+)\1\s*\)", RegexOptions.IgnoreCase);
            var contents = IO.File.ReadAllText(svr.MapPath(path));
            if(!pattern.IsMatch(contents))
            {
                bundlePaths.Add(path);
                continue;
            }


            var bundlePath = (IO.Path.GetDirectoryName(path) ?? string.Empty).Replace(@"\", "/") + "/";
            var bundleUrlPath = VirtualPathUtility.ToAbsolute(bundlePath);
            var bundleFilePath = String.Format("{0}{1}.bundle{2}",
                                               bundlePath,
                                               IO.Path.GetFileNameWithoutExtension(path),
                                               IO.Path.GetExtension(path));
            contents = pattern.Replace(contents, "url($1" + bundleUrlPath + "$2$1)");
            IO.File.WriteAllText(svr.MapPath(bundleFilePath), contents);
            bundlePaths.Add(bundleFilePath);
        }
        base.Include(bundlePaths.ToArray());
        return this;
    }

}

To use it, do:

bundles.Add(new StyleImagePathBundle("~/bundles/css").Include(
  "~/This/Is/Some/Folder/Path/layout.css"));

...instead of...

bundles.Add(new StyleBundle("~/bundles/css").Include(
  "~/This/Is/Some/Folder/Path/layout.css"));

What it does is (when not in debug mode) looks for url(<something>) and replaces it with url(<absolute\path\to\something>). I wrote the thing about 10 seconds ago so it might need a little tweaking. I've taken into account fully-qualified URLs and base64 DataURIs by making sure there's no colons (:) in the URL path. In our environment, images normally reside in the same folder as their css files, but I've tested it with both parent folders (url(../someFile.png)) and child folders (url(someFolder/someFile.png).

share|improve this answer
    
This is a great solution. I modified your Regex slightly so that it would also work with LESS files, but the original concept was exactly what I needed. Thanks. –  Tim Coulter Oct 17 '12 at 9:28
    
You might put regex initialization outside the loop as well. Perhaps as a static readonly property. –  Miha Markic Nov 22 '12 at 16:04

As of v1.1.0-alpha1 (pre release package) the framework uses the VirtualPathProvider to access files rather than touching the physical file system.

The updated transformer can be seen below:

public class StyleRelativePathTransform
    : IBundleTransform
{
    public void Process(BundleContext context, BundleResponse response)
    {
        Regex pattern = new Regex(@"url\s*\(\s*([""']?)([^:)]+)\1\s*\)", RegexOptions.IgnoreCase);

        response.Content = string.Empty;

        // open each of the files
        foreach (var file in response.Files)
        {
            using (var reader = new StreamReader(file.Open()))
            {
                var contents = reader.ReadToEnd();

                // apply the RegEx to the file (to change relative paths)
                var matches = pattern.Matches(contents);

                if (matches.Count > 0)
                {
                    var directoryPath = VirtualPathUtility.GetDirectory(file.VirtualPath);

                    foreach (Match match in matches)
                    {
                        // this is a path that is relative to the CSS file
                        var imageRelativePath = match.Groups[2].Value;

                        // get the image virtual path
                        var imageVirtualPath = VirtualPathUtility.Combine(directoryPath, imageRelativePath);

                        // convert the image virtual path to absolute
                        var quote = match.Groups[1].Value;
                        var replace = String.Format("url({0}{1}{0})", quote, VirtualPathUtility.ToAbsolute(imageVirtualPath));
                        contents = contents.Replace(match.Groups[0].Value, replace);
                    }

                }
                // copy the result into the response.
                response.Content = String.Format("{0}\r\n{1}", response.Content, contents);
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Actually, what this does if replacing the relative URLs in CSS by absolute ones. –  Fabrice Jan 12 '13 at 14:48

Here is a Bundle Transform that will replace css urls with urls relative to that css file. Just add it to your bundle and it should fix the issue.

public class CssUrlTransform: IBundleTransform
{
    public void Process(BundleContext context, BundleResponse response) {
        Regex exp = new Regex(@"url\([^\)]+\)", RegexOptions.IgnoreCase | RegexOptions.Singleline);
        foreach (FileInfo css in response.Files) {
            string cssAppRelativePath = css.FullName.Replace(context.HttpContext.Request.PhysicalApplicationPath, context.HttpContext.Request.ApplicationPath).Replace(Path.DirectorySeparatorChar, '/');
            string cssDir = cssAppRelativePath.Substring(0, cssAppRelativePath.LastIndexOf('/'));
            response.Content = exp.Replace(response.Content, m => TransformUrl(m, cssDir));
        }
    }


    private string TransformUrl(Match match, string cssDir) {
        string url = match.Value.Substring(4, match.Length - 5).Trim('\'', '"');

        if (url.StartsWith("http://") || url.StartsWith("data:image")) return match.Value;

        if (!url.StartsWith("/"))
            url = string.Format("{0}/{1}", cssDir, url);

        return string.Format("url({0})", url);
    }

}
share|improve this answer
    
This works for me, thanks! –  psulek Jul 20 '13 at 8:22
    
How to use it?, It's show me an exception: cannot convert type from BundleFile to FileInfo –  Stiger Apr 4 at 4:48

It is not necessary to specify a transform or have crazy subdirectory paths. After much troubleshooting I isolated it to this "simple" rule (is it a bug?)...

If your bundle path does not start with relative root of the items being included, then the web application root will not be taken into account.

Sounds like more of a bug to me, but anyway that's how you fix it with the current .NET 4.51 version. Perhaps the other answers were necessary on older ASP.NET builds, can't say don't have time to retrospectively test all that.

To clarify, here is an example:

I have these files...

~/Content/Images/Backgrounds/Some_Background_Tile.gif
~/Content/Site.css  - references the background image relatively, i.e. background: url('Images/...')

Then setup the bundle like...

BundleTable.Add(new StyleBundle("~/Bundles/Styles").Include("~/Content/Site.css"));

And render it like...

@Styles.Render("~/Bundles/Styles")

And get the "behaviour" (bug), the CSS files themselves have the application root (e.g. "http://localhost:1234/MySite/Content/Site.css") but the CSS image within all start "/Content/Images/..." or "/Images/..." depending on whether I add the transform or not.

Even tried creating the "Bundles" folder to see if it was to do with the path existing or not, but that didn't change anything. The solution to the problem is really the requirement that the name of the bundle must start with the path root.

Meaning this example is fixed by registering and rendering the bundle path like..

BundleTable.Add(new StyleBundle("~/Content/StylesBundle").Include("~/Content/Site.css"));
...
@Styles.Render("~/Content/StylesBundle")

So of course you could say this is RTFM, but I am quite sure me and others picked-up this "~/Bundles/..." path from the default template or somewhere in documentation at MSDN or ASP.NET web site, or just stumbled upon it because actually it's a quite logical name for a virtual path and makes sense to choose such virtual paths which do not conflict with real directories.

Anyway, that's the way it is. Microsoft see no bug. I don't agree with this, either it should work as expected or some exception should be thrown, or an additional override to adding the bundle path which opts to include the application root or not. I can't imagine why anyone would not want the application root included when there was one (normally unless you installed your web site with a DNS alias/default web site root). So actually that should be the default anyway.

share|improve this answer

Another option would be to use the IIS URL Rewrite module to map the virtual bundle image folder to the physical image folder. Below is an example of a rewrite rule from that you could use for a bundle called "~/bundles/yourpage/styles" - note the regex matches on alphanumeric characters as well as hyphens, underscores and periods, which are common in image file names.

<rewrite>
  <rules>
    <rule name="Bundle Images">
      <match url="^bundles/yourpage/images/([a-zA-Z0-9\-_.]+)" />
      <action type="Rewrite" url="Content/css/jquery-ui/images/{R:1}" />
    </rule>
  </rules>
</rewrite>

This approach creates a little extra overhead, but allows you to have more control over your bundle names, and also reduces the number of bundles you may have to reference on one page. Of course, if you have to reference multiple 3rd party css files that contain relative image path references, you still can't get around creating multiple bundles.

share|improve this answer

Grinn solution is great.

However it doesn't work for me when there are parent folder relative references in the url. i.e. url('../../images/car.png')

So, I slightly changed the Include method in order to resolve the paths for each regex match, allowing relative paths and also to optionally embed the images in the css.

I also changed the IF DEBUG to check BundleTable.EnableOptimizations instead of HttpContext.Current.IsDebuggingEnabled.

    public new Bundle Include(params string[] virtualPaths)
    {
        if (!BundleTable.EnableOptimizations)
        {
            // Debugging. Bundling will not occur so act normal and no one gets hurt. 
            base.Include(virtualPaths.ToArray());
            return this;
        }
        var bundlePaths = new List<string>();
        var server = HttpContext.Current.Server;
        var pattern = new Regex(@"url\s*\(\s*([""']?)([^:)]+)\1\s*\)", RegexOptions.IgnoreCase);
        foreach (var path in virtualPaths)
        {
            var contents = File.ReadAllText(server.MapPath(path));
            var matches = pattern.Matches(contents);
            // Ignore the file if no matches
            if (matches.Count == 0)
            {
                bundlePaths.Add(path);
                continue;
            }
            var bundlePath = (System.IO.Path.GetDirectoryName(path) ?? string.Empty).Replace(@"\", "/") + "/";
            var bundleUrlPath = VirtualPathUtility.ToAbsolute(bundlePath);
            var bundleFilePath = string.Format("{0}{1}.bundle{2}",
                                               bundlePath,
                                               System.IO.Path.GetFileNameWithoutExtension(path),
                                               System.IO.Path.GetExtension(path));
            // Transform the url (works with relative path to parent folder "../")
            contents = pattern.Replace(contents, m =>
            {
                var relativeUrl = m.Groups[2].Value;
                var urlReplace = GetUrlReplace(bundleUrlPath, relativeUrl, server);
                return string.Format("url({0}{1}{0})", m.Groups[1].Value, urlReplace);
            });
            File.WriteAllText(server.MapPath(bundleFilePath), contents);
            bundlePaths.Add(bundleFilePath);
        }
        base.Include(bundlePaths.ToArray());
        return this;
    }


    private string GetUrlReplace(string bundleUrlPath, string relativeUrl, HttpServerUtility server)
    {
        // Return the absolute uri
        Uri baseUri = new Uri("http://dummy.org");
        var absoluteUrl = new Uri(new Uri(baseUri, bundleUrlPath), relativeUrl).AbsolutePath;
        var localPath = server.MapPath(absoluteUrl);
        if (IsEmbedEnabled && File.Exists(localPath))
        {
            var fi = new FileInfo(localPath);
            if (fi.Length < 0x4000)
            {
                // Embed the image in uri
                string contentType = GetContentType(fi.Extension);
                if (null != contentType)
                {
                    var base64 = Convert.ToBase64String(File.ReadAllBytes(localPath));
                    // Return the serialized image
                    return string.Format("data:{0};base64,{1}", contentType, base64);
                }
            }
        }
        // Return the absolute uri 
        return absoluteUrl;
    }

Hope it helps, regards.

share|improve this answer

You can simply add another level of depth to your virtual bundle path

    //Two levels deep bundle path so that paths are maintained after minification
    bundles.Add(new StyleBundle("~/Content/css/css").Include("~/Content/bootstrap/bootstrap.css", "~/Content/site.css"));

This is a super low-tech answer and kind of a hack but it works and won't require any pre-processing. Given the length and complexity of some of these answers I prefer doing it this way.

share|improve this answer
    
This does not help when you have your web app as virtual application in IIS. I mean it can work but you must name your IIS virtual app as in your code, which is not what you want, right? –  psulek Apr 23 at 17:59
    
I've the same problem when app is virtual application in IIS. This answer helps me. –  Victor Jun 2 at 9:45

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