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I want save a 128bits UUID into a 16bytes string, which will be store in Core Data as an index attribute of my ManagedObject, to ensure insert and select efficiency.

Is there any way to store 128bits UUID into a 16bytes ASCII string? If there is, how to convert between 32bytes UUID string and 16bytes ASCII string?

I've tried to store a CFUUIDBytes into string using code below, but the value changed after the string was generated. (if any byte value > 127, its value changes in the generated string)

CFUUIDRef uuidRef = CFUUIDCreate(kCFAllocatorDefault);
CFUUIDBytes uuidBytes = CFUUIDGetUUIDBytes(uuidRef);
NSString *utf8String = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%c%c%c%c%c%c%c%c%c%c%c%c%c%c%c%c", 
                            uuidBytes.byte0, uuidBytes.byte1, uuidBytes.byte2,
                            uuidBytes.byte3, uuidBytes.byte4, uuidBytes.byte5,
                            uuidBytes.byte6, uuidBytes.byte7, uuidBytes.byte8,
                            uuidBytes.byte9, uuidBytes.byte10, uuidBytes.byte11,
                            uuidBytes.byte12, uuidBytes.byte13, uuidBytes.byte14,
                            uuidBytes.byte15];
share|improve this question
    
It takes 16-bytes to store 128-bits but these cannot be ASCII (or UTF-8) as they are binary; you will need to use at least 32-bytes. – trojanfoe Jul 6 '12 at 6:14
    
Thank you for your comment! Could you explain more about why it can't be stored in ASCII or UTF-8? Actually, my test also shows what you suggested, but I just don't know why. – Cable W Jul 6 '12 at 6:52
1  
They can't be stored in ASCII/UTF-8 because the process of stringifying them requires each byte to be stored in 2 bytes. You might be able to use the binary form in Core Data (I don't know)? – trojanfoe Jul 6 '12 at 7:02

Use this category on NSString courtesy:

   static unichar x (unsigned int); 

@implementation NSString (TWUUID) 

+ (NSString*) stringWithUniqueId 
{ 
    CFUUIDRef uuid = CFUUIDCreate(NULL); 
    CFUUIDBytes b = CFUUIDGetUUIDBytes(uuid); 
    unichar unichars[22]; 
    unichar* c = unichars; 
    *c++ = x(b.byte0 >> 2); 
    *c++ = x((b.byte0 & 3 << 4) + (b.byte1 >> 4)); 
    *c++ = x((b.byte1 & 15 << 2) + (b.byte2 >> 6)); 
    *c++ = x(b.byte2 & 63); 
    *c++ = x(b.byte3 >> 2); 
    *c++ = x((b.byte3 & 3 << 4) + (b.byte4 >> 4)); 
    *c++ = x((b.byte4 & 15 << 2) + (b.byte5 >> 6)); 
    *c++ = x(b.byte5 & 63); 
    *c++ = x(b.byte6 >> 2); 
    *c++ = x((b.byte6 & 3 << 4) + (b.byte7 >> 4)); 
    *c++ = x((b.byte7 & 15 << 2) + (b.byte8 >> 6)); 
    *c++ = x(b.byte8 & 63); 
    *c++ = x(b.byte9 >> 2); 
    *c++ = x((b.byte9 & 3 << 4) + (b.byte10 >> 4)); 
    *c++ = x((b.byte10 & 15 << 2) + (b.byte11 >> 6)); 
    *c++ = x(b.byte11 & 63); 
    *c++ = x(b.byte12 >> 2); 
    *c++ = x((b.byte12 & 3 << 4) + (b.byte13 >> 4)); 
    *c++ = x((b.byte13 & 15 << 2) + (b.byte14 >> 6)); 
    *c++ = x(b.byte14 & 63); 
    *c++ = x(b.byte15 >> 2); 
    *c = x(b.byte15 & 3); 
    CFRelease(uuid); 
    return [NSString stringWithCharacters: unichars length: 16];
} 
@end

unichar x (unsigned int c)
{
    if (c < 26) return 'a' + c;
    if (c < 52) return 'A' + c - 26;
    if (c < 62) return '0' + c - 52;
    if (c == 62) return '$';
    return '_';
}


...


    NSLog(@"%u", [[NSString stringWithCString:[[NSString stringWithUniqueId] UTF8String] encoding:NSASCIIStringEncoding] length]);
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. But using CFUUIDCreateString() can only generate 36 bytes UUID String. Since I'd like to store UUID as primary id of my Core Date object, I want it be as short as possible (16bytes). – Cable W Jul 6 '12 at 5:59
    
I tried, but seems not working. Can you provide a working example? the working code, I mean. – Cable W Jul 6 '12 at 6:09
    
I'm sorry, that code was janky. Try the one in my edit to the actual post. – CodaFi Jul 6 '12 at 6:10
    
I tried this one as well, and tested the output. But it seems worse than the code I used above. Maybe I did some way wrong. Could you please test your code and post the working code? thanks – Cable W Jul 6 '12 at 6:14
    
It works, but the result is still 36 bytes NSString. What I want is 16 bytes NSString. But thanks anyway! – Cable W Jul 6 '12 at 6:57

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