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I have a class Parent which has as property Items that is a List(of Child)

If I use this code

Parallel.ForEach()(parent.Items,
            Sub(item)
                item.DoSomething()
            End Sub)

I get a compiler warning No overload for method ForEach() accepts this count of arguments

If I change the code to

Parallel.ForEach(of Child)(parent.Items,
            Sub(item)
                item.DoSomething()
            End Sub)

it works.

However, in c# I can just write

Parellel.ForEach(parent.Items, item =>
    {
        item.DoSomething();
    });

Why does VB not infer in this case?

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Can you be more specific with the parameter type, using Sub(item As Child)? –  Jon Skeet Jul 6 '12 at 6:32
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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

In your first VB example you have an extra set of parentheses so you are calling .ForEach wih no parameters. Remove them and it will work:

Parallel.ForEach(parent.Items,
         Sub(item)
            item.DoSomething()
         End Sub)
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Stupid mistake, thanks. –  SchlaWiener Jul 6 '12 at 8:03
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If you want the VB compiler to infer the type arguments, you don't provide the type argument (Of ) brackets:

Parallel.ForEach(parent.Items,
        Sub(item)
            item.DoSomething()
        End Sub)

In much the same way, as if you want the C# compiler to infer types, you don't provide the type argument <> angle brackets.

The error was trying to tell you that what the VB compiler is seeing in your first example is a call to ForEach with no arguments () followed by a call on whatever the return value from that first call is.

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shf301 was first, but +1 anyway –  SchlaWiener Jul 6 '12 at 8:03
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