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I am extremely comfortable with Python. I'm "ok" with Java with good experience in Android(But we all know that most of the stuff in Android is so well covered in many blogs that the learning curve is not really that steep.) Thus, coming back to the web-app. This is what I'm expecting:-

  1. A lot of requests. (Scalability.)
  2. Concurrency.
  3. Responsive.
  4. Good error reporting.
  5. Less steeper learning curve.
  6. Stacks well with PostgresDb and Redis.
  7. Provides some way to build cleaner apis(Something django-piston.)
  8. Last but not the least, I've a time period of 2 months to finish it.(Not the proto-type but the final version.)

Edit:

Node.js seems exceptionally good to build a fast prototype but it is too buggy to scale up.

PHP is a language that I never found myself comfortable to code in. Neither was I comfortable in JAVA till I picked up Android coding. Thus, a preference to Scala. Also, I learned that fb chat was built on Erlang. And I believe that of many things wrong in fb, one of the few things that is right is their stack and preferences of particular languages/frameworks to get done with their features.

I'm a noob in Scala but I don't find the programming language that difficult. I have gone through quite a few blog posts on Play vs Lift, Web dev in Scala, advantages and disadvantages of Scala and many such things. The only reasoning I am shifting to Scala is I am terribly pissed with the concurrency of Python and how non-scalable it is.(I am a huge fan of twisted and use it for a zillion other things but I just don't think Django/Rails are cut out to deal with concurrent, stable, responsive web app.)

My question here is, am I wrong? Is it worth it to jump to Scala, taking everything into consideration? I really hope to get some good answers because I don't want to spend long frustrating hours getting a skeletal version of my web-app done and then realize that it is not scalable. Also, what would be a preferred stack? What does the industry use? (I know a lot of questions but it is a scary thing to jump from Django/Rails to anything else.)

Any help would be appreciated.

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Is there a reason you haven't considered PHP with HipHop? –  leonsas Jul 6 '12 at 6:36
    
Also, have you considered nodejs? –  Paulo Scardine Jul 6 '12 at 6:42
    
@PauloScardine I've edited the question to answer yours. A comparison of Scala with nodejs would be excellent too. I am open to anything(least preference to PHP). But a compelling case should do it for me. It should just work and be scalable. The users don't care what I use as long as they can use it. –  Hick Jul 6 '12 at 6:47
    
node.js seems to be very good at this problem domain. I would take a second look: github.com/aaronblohowiak/Push-It#readme –  Paulo Scardine Jul 6 '12 at 7:00
    
Check out gevent. I've only used it for small projects and I'm not well versed in concurrency, but from what I can gather it is very effective. The author is an active member of SO and answers many of the gevent tagged questions. Also check this out for a comparison of python web servers and scalability. –  msvalkon Jul 6 '12 at 7:36
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closed as not constructive by Nicolas, oluies, Daniel C. Sobral, kapa, talonmies Jul 7 '12 at 6:25

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3 Answers

up vote 12 down vote accepted

I only started learning play in the last few days and I love it. Has all the benefits of Java (For me this is machine learning related) with all the loveliness of a simple to use MVC framework.

Play has great support for web sockets and has a lovely sample chat application that you can play around with to see if it fits your bill.

https://github.com/playframework/Play20/tree/master/samples/scala/websocket-chat

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+1 Play is absurdly good, cannot recommend it enough. Coming from dynamic language side of the fence, I have zero interest in going back. Type safe code that completely rips performance-wise, the search is over... –  virtualeyes Jul 6 '12 at 11:52
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Not sure about django integration, but gevent is able to use websocket, and long polling is a well known pattern on gevent. You can use that as a start for developing such app.

You can use tornado too, but i am not familiar with that.

on top of that, this is a project from a friend of mine, that integrate django with tornado and their socket.io plugin https://github.com/felixleong/tornadio-with-django

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Picking up the previously mentioned gevent approach from sweemeng: Go for it. It even comes with possible Django integration using gunicorn. Here are some articles to help you get started & get the idea:

Good introductions:

Example code:

Deployment and libraries:

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Seems quite good. But, performance wise, if I compare it to Scala(Play) which one would be better? –  Hick Jul 6 '12 at 7:51
    
I can not give you an answer for that. Just assuming that you are familiar with Python, so it would be faster and safer for you to implement a solution using it rather that picking up something completely new. If you do it for the learning effect only, just go with Scala. –  Torsten Engelbrecht Jul 6 '12 at 8:05
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