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I have a question about the magic methods getter and setter.

My question is: What is better (faster, safer)?

P.S. This is ActionScript 3, but the question can be answered for other languages like PHP, JavaScript, C# also.

case 1

    public class Test extends Sprite
    {
        private var _test : uint = 0;

        public function Test()
        {
            start();
        }

        private function start() : void
        {
            trace(_test); ** Take the private var _test **
        }

        public function set test(value : uint) : void
        {
            _test = value;
            start();
        }

        public function get test() : uint
        {
            return _test;
        }
   }

or case 2

    public class Test extends Sprite
    {
        private var _test : uint = 0;

        public function Test()
        {
            start();
        }

        private function start() : void
        {
            trace(test); ** difference here, take the public function test **
        }

        public function set test(value : uint) : void
        {
            _test = value;
            start();
        }

        public function get test() : uint
        {
            return _test;
        }
   }

What is the best (fastest) way?

Thanks!

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

I always prefer to use getter and setter also into methods of the same class where they are declared (although I could use privare variables).

Getters and setters hide logic that is required when you have to set or get a class property, so you can modify "what-you-actually-do" inside your setter/getter without worry about impact in client methods.

They also avoid repetition of code.

But this is just my point of view... :)

share|improve this answer
    
True didnt thought about that. I will use the getter and setter so i dont have the repetition of code for manipulation the properties. – Ron van der Heijden Jul 6 '12 at 7:36

You're about 90% of the way to writing your own test case to find out yourself..

Getters and setters are intended to add control over what happens when a property is set or retrieved or to create read-only or write-only properties.

These benefits greatly outweigh any possible performance differences.


As for those performance differences, here is a test environment:

// Test property.
var _test:uint = 0;
function get test():uint{ return _test; }
function set test(value:uint):void{ _test = value; }

// Direct access test.
function directTest(amt:int):Number
{
    // Directly accessing the property.
    var t:Number = getTimer();
    for(var i:int = 0; i < amt; i++)
    {
        var temp:uint = _test;
        _test = i;
    }

    return getTimer() - t;
}


// Getter/setter test.
function viaTest(amt:int):Number
{
    // Via getter/setter.
    var t:Number = getTimer();
    for(var i:int = 0; i < amt; i++)
    {
        var temp:uint = test;
        test = i;
    }

    return getTimer() - t;
}

A quick demonstration of how to use this:

trace("Direct: " + directTest(1000000));
trace("Getter/Setter: " + viaTest(1000000));

And some results that I got:

Amount      Direct      Get/Set
1000        0           0
5000        0           0
20,000      0           2
150,000     1           14
500,000     2           46
2,000,000   10          184
10,000,000  47          921
share|improve this answer
    
And what if I set and get the properties like 100 times per second? – Ron van der Heijden Jul 6 '12 at 7:15
    
@Bondye, wow 100 times per second?! Careful here you might toast your CPU. – this.lau_ Jul 6 '12 at 7:29
    
@Bondye I've added some actual data for your viewing pleasure. Essentially you're looking at less than a second for both options even when accessing the property 10 million times. – Marty Jul 6 '12 at 7:30
    
@MartyWallace Thanks for this! – Ron van der Heijden Jul 6 '12 at 7:34

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