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nI would like to use memoization to cache the results of certain expensive operations so that they are not computed over and over again.

Both memoise and R.cache fit my needs. However, I am finding that caching is not robust across calls.

Here is an example that demonstrates the problem I'm seeing:

library(memoise)

# Memoisation works: b() is called only once
a <- function(x) runif(1)
replicate(5, a())
b <- memoise(a)
replicate(5, b())

# Memoisation fails: mfn() is called every single time
ProtoTester <- proto(
  calc = function(.) {
    fn <- function() print(runif(1))
    mfn <- memoise(fn)
    invisible(mfn())
  }      
)
replicate(5, ProtoTester$calc())

Updated based on answer

This question can have different answers based on whether persistent or non-persistent caching is used. Non-persistent caching (such as memoise) may require single assignment and then the answer below is a nice way to go. Persistent caching (such as R.cache) works across sessions and should be robust with respect to multiple assignments. The approach above works with R.cache. Despite the multiple assignments, fn is only called once with R.cache. It would be called twice with memoise.

> ProtoTester <- proto(
+     calc = function(.) {
+         fn <- function() print(runif(1))
+         invisible(memoizedCall(fn))
+     }      
+ )
> replicate(5, ProtoTester$calc())
[1] 0.977563
[1] 0.1279641
[1] 0.01358866
[1] 0.9993092
[1] 0.3114813
[1] 0.97756303 0.12796408 0.01358866 0.99930922 0.31148128
> ProtoTester <- proto(
+     calc = function(.) {
+         fn <- function() print(runif(1))
+         invisible(memoizedCall(fn))
+     }      
+ )
> replicate(5, ProtoTester$calc())
[1] 0.97756303 0.12796408 0.01358866 0.99930922 0.31148128

The reason why I thought I had a problem with R.cache is that I was passing a proto method as the function to memoizedCall. proto methods are bound to environments in ways that R.cache has a hard time with. What you have to do in this case is unbind the function (get from an instantiated method to a simple function) and then pass the object manually as the first argument. The following example shows how this works (both Report and Report$loader are proto objects:

# This will not memoize the call
memoizedCall(Report$loader$download_report)

# This works as intended
memoizedCall(with(Report$loader, download_report), Report$loader)

I'd love to know why R.cache works with normal functions bound to environments but fails with proto instantiated methods.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In your code, the function is memoized anew each time it is called. The following should work: it is only memoized once, when it is defined.

ProtoTester <- proto(
  calc = {
    fn <- function() print(runif(1))
    mfn <- memoise(fn)
    function(.) mfn()
  }
)
replicate(5, ProtoTester$calc())
share|improve this answer
    
I had misunderstood the object identity mechanism that the memoise implementations use. Because R.cache has persistence associated with memoisation I thought it is designed to work based on the content/code of the function as opposed to its internal R id or else it wouldn't work across sessions. Creating an expression with memoization as a side-effect is a nice pattern. Your code works great with R.cache even across assignments (executing the ProtoTester assignment multiple times which assigns fn multiple times). I wonder why it did not work for me before... –  Sim Jul 6 '12 at 16:18
    
I checked again and found out that R.cache works with my old code. I must have overlooked something simple. –  Sim Jul 6 '12 at 16:20
    
I updated the question and clarified the differences in behavior when persistence is involved. –  Sim Jul 6 '12 at 16:33
    
I tracked down the source of the problem with R.cache and proto. R.cache seems confused by proto's instantiated methods. Unbinding them and passing the object explicitly solves the problem. –  Sim Jul 6 '12 at 17:29

An alternative solution would be to use evals for evaluation from (my) pander package which has an internal (temporary in an environment for current R session or persistent with disk storage) caching engine. Short example based on your code:

library(pander)
ProtoTester <- proto(
  calc = function(.) {
    fn <- function() runif(1)
    mfn <- evals('fn()')[[1]]$result
    invisible(mfn)
  }      
)

And running evals with cache off and on would result in:

> evals.option('cache', FALSE)
> replicate(5, ProtoTester$calc())
[1] 0.7152186 0.4529955 0.4160411 0.1166872 0.8776698

> evals.option('cache', TRUE)
> evals.option('cache.time', 0)
> replicate(5, ProtoTester$calc())
[1] 0.7716874 0.7716874 0.7716874 0.7716874 0.7716874

Please note that the evals.option function si to be renamed to evalsOption soon to mitigate R CMD check warnings about S3 methods.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks, I'll check it out. –  Sim Jul 6 '12 at 16:22

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