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I have a python list which contains dictionaries and I want to make a new list which contain dictionaries with unique keys and associated list values like below:

Input:
 [{1: 2}, {2: 2}, {1: 3}, {2: 1}, {1: 3}]
Output:
 [{1:[2,3,3]},{2:[2,1]}]

Thanks in advance.

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10  
    
Does every unique key also contain itself in the list? I'm just wondering how the list [1,2,3] is formed since I must be missing something. –  jamylak Jul 6 '12 at 8:10
1  
@IgnacioVazquez-Abrams: Can we dispense with that URL? Better use something like this script and write more verbose recommendations to include more information on what the OP has tried, optionally with a link to that article. –  Martijn Pieters Jul 6 '12 at 8:11
1  
@jamylak it was a typo in output –  user1289853 Jul 6 '12 at 8:14
    
You can adapt this answer to do what you want. –  Shawn Chin Jul 6 '12 at 8:15

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

How about:

input = [{1: 2}, {2: 2}, {1: 3}, {2: 1}, {1: 3}]

r = {}
for d in input:
    # (assumes just one key/value per dict)
    ((x, y),) = d.items() 
    r.setdefault(x, []).append(y)

print [ {k: v} for (k, v) in r.items() ]

Result:

[{1: [2, 3, 3]}, {2: [2, 1]}]

[update]

just curious : Can you explain whats going on in ((x, y),) = d.items() and r.setdefault(x, []).append(y) ? – damned

First the ((x, y),) = d.items():

  • at this point, d will be an element from input, like {1: 2}
  • d.items() will be something analogous to [(1, 2)]
  • in order to unpack 1 and 2 into x and y, we need the extra , (otherwise the interpreter will think the outer parenthesis are doing grouping instead of defining a single element tuple)

The r.setdefault(x, []).append(y) is analogous to:

if not r.has_key(x):
     r[x] = []
r[x].append(y)
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1  
just curious : Can you explain whats going on in ((x, y),) = d.items() and r.setdefault(x, []).append(y) ? –  damned Jul 6 '12 at 9:23
1  
updated with comments. –  Paulo Scardine Jul 6 '12 at 9:56

Trick is to use dict.setdefault to start off a list and append to it:

input = [{1: 2}, {2: 2}, {1: 3}, {2: 1}, {1: 3}]
output = {}
for d in input:
    for k,v in d.items():
        output.setdefault(k, []).append(v)

# output contains {1: [2, 3, 3], 2: [2, 1]}

output=[{k:v} for k,v in output.items()]

# output contains [{1: [2, 3, 3]}, {2: [2, 1]}]

What setdefault does is return either the existing list keyed by 'k', or if that key does not exist in the dictionary, it creates a new entry for that key with the second argument and returns that. Either way it returns the list whether it was pre-existing or new, so that you can then append to it.

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My output was [{1:[2,3,3]},{2:[2,1]}] not {1: [2, 3, 3], 2: [2, 1]} –  user1289853 Jul 6 '12 at 8:45
    
Indeed. Added a transformation. –  Benedict Jul 6 '12 at 9:10
>>> lis=[{1: 2}, {2: 2}, {1: 3}, {2: 1}, {1: 3}]
>>> new_lis=[{}]
>>> for x in lis:
    for y in x:
       if y in new_lis[0]:
           new_lis[0][y].append(x[y])
           new_lis[0][y].sort()
       else :new_lis[0][y]=[x[y]]


>>> new_lis
[{1: [2, 3, 3], 2: [1, 2]}]
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>>> data = [{1: 2}, {2: 2}, {1: 3}, {2: 1}, {1: 3}]
... 
... from itertools import groupby
... 
... keyFn = lambda x: x.keys()[0]
... 
... [{k: [i.values()[0] for i in g]} for k, g in groupby(sorted(data, key=keyFn), keyFn)]
0: [{1: [2, 3, 3]}, {2: [2, 1]}]
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output = []
for b in a:
  added = 0
  i = 0
  for c in output:
    if b.keys()[0] in c.keys():
       output[i][b.keys()[0]].append(b[b.keys()[0]])
       added = 1
    i += 1

  if not added:
    output.append({b.keys()[0]: [b[b.keys()[0]]]})
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In your example, what is ls? (for c in ls:). –  octopusgrabbus Jul 14 '12 at 22:14
    
Oh thanks for pointing that out. That was a type. ls is actually output. –  vaidik Jul 15 '12 at 7:12

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