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I switched from C++ to Java and C# and think the usage of namespaces/packages is much better there (well structured). Then I came back to C++ and tried to use namespaces the same way but the required syntax is horrible within the header file.

namespace MyCompany
{
    namespace MyModule
    {
        namespace MyModulePart //e.g. Input
        {
            namespace MySubModulePart
            {
                namespace ...
                {
                    public class MyClass    

The following seems strange to me too (to avoid the deep indent):

namespace MyCompany
{
namespace MyModule
{
namespace MyModulePart //e.g. Input
{
namespace MySubModulePart
{
namespace ...
{
     public class MyClass
     {

Is there a shorter Way to express the above thing? I am missing something like

namespace MyCompany::MyModule::MyModulePart::...
{
   public class MyClass

Update

Ok, some say the concept of usage in Java/C# and C++ is different. Really? I think (dynamic) class loading is not the only purpose for namespaces (this is a very technical reasoned perspective). Why shouldn't I use it for a readability and structurization, e.g think of "IntelliSense".

Currently, there is no logic / glue between a namespace and what you can find there. Java and C# does this much better... Why including <iostream> and having namespace std? Ok, if you say the logic should rely on the header to include, why does the #include does not uses an "IntelliSense" friendly syntax like #include <std::io::stream> or <std/io/stream>? I think the missing structurization in the default libs is one weakness of C++ compared to Java/C#.

If uniqueness to avid conflicts is one Point (which is a point of C# and Java, too) a good idea is to use the project name or company name as namespace, don't you think so?

On the one hand it's said C++ is the most flexible... but everyone said "don't do this"? It seems to me C++ can do many things but has a horrible syntax even for the easiest things in many cases compared to C#.

Update 2

Most users say it is nonsense to create a deeper nesting than two Levels. Ok, so what about Windows::UI::Xaml and Windows::UI::Xaml::Controls::Primitives namespaces in Win8 development? I think Microsoft's usage of namespaces makes sense and it is indeed deeper than just 2 Levels. I think bigger libraries / projects need a deeper nesting (I hate class names like ExtraLongClassNameBecauseEveryThingIsInTheSameNameSpace... then you could put everything into the global namespace, too.)

Update 3 - Conclusion

Most say "don't do it", but... even boost has a deeper nesting then one or two levels. Yes, it is a library but: If you want reusable code - treat your own code like a library you would give someone else. I also use a deeper nesting for discovery purposes using namespaces.

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1  
Is it an abuse of namespace keyword? –  Nawaz Jul 6 '12 at 8:20
    
@Nawaz: yes it is. –  PlasmaHH Jul 6 '12 at 8:21
3  
namespaces and c#/java module systems do not serve the same purpose, as such you should not try to use them the same way. and no, there is no simpler syntax, simply beacuse it makes no sense to provide a syntax to make things easier to do, that are not meant to do. –  PlasmaHH Jul 6 '12 at 8:22
    
@PlasmaHH ... so the weakness is the missing structurization of the std lib of C++? (see my simple example within the update) –  Beachwalker Jul 9 '12 at 9:01
1  
@PlasmaHH Intellisense and other helpers for/after header (package)inclusion. Large Projects within one company might need more than one nesting (e.g. vw::golflib::io) for a clear statement what a namespace contains at which "scope". Well, you could just use vw:: but if namespace meant to be used to avoid clashes, why are the so horrible to declare? This ends up to a point that noone uses it or just uses namespace with a deepness of one (as often suggestet). –  Beachwalker Jul 9 '12 at 14:10

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

No, and please don't do that.

The purpose of namespaces is primarily resolving conflicts in the global namespace.

A secondary purpose is local abbreviation of symbols; e.g. a complex UpdateUI method may use an using namespace WndUI to use shorter symbols.

I'm on a 1.3MLoc project, and the only namespaces we have are:

  • #imported external COM libraries (mainly to isolate header conflicts between #import and #include windows.h)
  • One level of "public API" namespaces for certain aspects (UI, DB access etc.)
  • "Implementation Detail" namespaces that are not part of the public API (anonymous namespaces in .cpp's, or ModuleDetailHereBeTygers namespaces in header-only libs)
  • enums are the biggest problem in my experience, they pollute like crazy.
  • I still fell it's entirely to much namespaces

In this project, class names etc.do use a two- or three-letter "region" code (e.g. CDBNode instead of DB::CNode). If you prefer the latter, there's room for a second level of "public" namespaces, but no more.

Class-specific enums etc. can be members of those classes (though I agree this is not always good, and it's sometimes hard to say whether you should)

There's rarely need for a "company" namespace either, except if you are having big problems with 3rd party libraries that are distributed as binary, don't provide their own namespace, and can't be easily put into one (e.g. in a binary distribution). Still, in my experience forcing them into a namespace is much easier to do.


[edit] As per Stegi's follow-up question:

Ok, so what about Windows::UI::Xaml and Windows::UI::Xaml::Controls::Primitives namespaces in Win8 development? I think Microsoft's usage of namespaces makes sense and it is indeed deeper than just 2 Levels

Sorry if I wasn't clear enough: Two levels isn't an hard limit, and more isn't intrinsically bad. I just wanted to point out that you rarely need more than two, from my experience, even on a large code base. Nesting deeper or more shallow is a tradeoff.

Now, the Microsoft case is arguably different. Presumably a much larger team, and all the code is library.

I'd assume Microsoft is imitating here the success of the .NET Library, where namespaces contribute to the discoverability of the extensive library. (.NET has about 18000 types.)

I'd further assume that there is an optimal (order of magnitude of) symbols in a namespace. say, 1 doesn't make sense, 100 sounds right, 10000 is clearly to much.


TL;DR: It's a tradeoff, and we don't have hard numbers. Play safe, don't overdo in any direction. The "Don't do that" comes merely from the "You have problems with that, I'd have problems with that, and I don't see a reason why you'd need it.".

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2  
Ok, so what about Windows::UI::Xaml and Windows::UI::Xaml::Controls::Primitives namespaces in Win8 development? I think Microsoft's usage of namespaces makes sense and it is indeed deeper than just 2 Levels. –  Beachwalker Jul 26 '12 at 20:19
    
Response got a tiny little bit longer, see edit. –  peterchen Jul 27 '12 at 7:26

C++ namespaces are used to group interfaces, not to divide components or express political division.

The standard goes out of its way to forbid Java-like use of namespaces. For example, namespace aliases provide a way to easily use deeply-nested or long namespace names.

namespace a {
namespace b {
namespace c {}
}
}

namespace nsc = a::b::c;

But namespace nsc {} would then be an error, because a namespace may only be defined using its original-namespace-name. Essentially the standard makes things easy for the user of such a library but hard for the implementer. This discourages people from writing such things but mitigates the effects if they do.

You should have one namespace per interface defined by a set of related classes and functions. Internal or optional sub-interfaces might go into nested namespaces. But more than two levels deep should be a very serious red flag.

Consider using underscore characters and identifier prefixes where the :: operator isn't needed.

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1  
I think std::tr1:: and std::tr2:: are used to express political and religious division. (+1 btw) –  Nawaz Jul 6 '12 at 9:21
1  
Ok, so what about Windows::UI::Xaml and Windows::UI::Xaml::Controls::Primitives namespaces in Win8 development? I think Microsoft's usage of namespaces makes sense and it is indeed deeper than just 2 Levels. –  Beachwalker Jul 26 '12 at 20:18

Here a quote from Lzz (Lazy C++) docs:

Lzz recognizes the following C++ constructs:

namespace definition

    An unnamed namespace and all enclosed declarations are output to the source file. This rule overrides all others.

    The name of a named namespace may be qualified.

        namespace A::B { typedef int I; }

    is equivalent to:

        namespace A { namespace B { typedef int I; } }

Of course the quality of sources that depends on such tools is debatable... I would say it's more a curiosity, showing that the syntax disease induced by C++ can take many form (I have mine, too...)

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Both standards (C++2003 and C++11) are very explicit that the name of the namespace is an identifier. This means that explicit nested headers are required.

My impression that this is not a big deal to allow placing qualified identifier besides a simple name of the namespace, but for some reason this is not allowed.

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Yes, you will have to do it like

namespace A{ 
namespace B{
namespace C{} 
} 
}

However, you are trying to use the namespaces in a way they are not supposed to be used. Check this question, maybe you will find it useful.

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