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Following is a template class of Vector which stores different types of data elements. check the code of copy constructor and in the main. What I was expecting that the statement "cout << vCHAR2[2] << endl;" should print the value "expense" because copy contractor is doing a shallow copy but it's printing "liability".

Can anybody help me? Thanks.

template<typename T>
class Vector{
  private:
      T* ptr;
      int size;
  public:
      Vector<T>(int s = 10){
           size = s;
           if(size!=0)
           {
               ptr = new T[size];

           }else{
               ptr = 0;
           }

      }
      Vector<T>(const Vector<T> &copy){
            this->size=copy.getSize();

            if(size !=0)
            {
                 ptr=new T[size];
                 for(int i=0;i<size;i++)
                    ptr[i] = copy.ptr[i];    
            }else{
               this->ptr=0;
            }
      }

      ~Vector<T>(){
         if(size>0)
         {
            delete[] ptr;
         }
      }
      int getSize() const
      {
          return size;    
      }
      const Vector<T> & operator = (const Vector<T> &rhs){
            if(this!=&rhs)
                 delete [] this->ptr;
                 size = rhs.size;
                 if(size!=0)
                 {
                      ptr=new T[size];
                      for(int i=0;i<size;i++)
                              ptr[i] = rhs.ptr[i];
            }

            return *this;

      }

      T& operator[](int index){
         if(index>=0 && index<=size)
            return ptr[index];
      }
};    




int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
  Vector<char*> vCHAR(10);
  vCHAR[0]="asset";
  vCHAR[1]="income";
  vCHAR[2]="liability";

  Vector<char*> vCHAR2(vCHAR);
  vCHAR[2] = "expense";

  cout << vCHAR[2] << endl;

  cout << vCHAR2[2] << endl;

  system("PAUSE");
  return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}
share|improve this question
    
Note that you're assigning a string literal (e.g. "asset") into a char*. That's asking for trouble. Make that char* a const. –  eran Jul 6 '12 at 8:31
1  
I strongly advise you to use std::string rather than char pointers. –  Zyx 2000 Jul 6 '12 at 9:05

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The copy ctor does a deep copy, so vCHAR2 has its own array of elements. So it doesn't need see when you alter the elements of the source Vector. (it would see it when you altered the data you pointed to via strcpy() or access to vCHAR[2][0]='X'; (provided this wouldn't crash your programm - as you operate on string literals))

share|improve this answer
    
I got you .... thanks ... but can u tell me that why my teacher was saying that it will cause a shallow copy issue for char*? –  developer Jul 6 '12 at 11:21
    
@developer: It's something in between a shallow and a deep copy. You get your own version of the char*-array itself, but not for the data the pointers refer to. So modifiing this data would affect both Vector's, but just redirecting one of the pointers to another location wouldn't. –  C. Stoll Jul 6 '12 at 11:30
    
oh yessss.... Thanks a lot. –  developer Jul 6 '12 at 12:31

with vCHAR[2] = "expense" you are changing the pointer inside the vector vCHAR, but the vCHAR2[2] still point to the old location. In short - there is no shallow copy of a pointer. If you'd re-used T* from the source when copying the vector, you'd have what you wanted.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your help... but had to choose only one answer as accepted answer.... –  developer Jul 6 '12 at 11:18

The design you have chosen to implement a vector is dangerous. If you have decided to manage elements using a kind of the node allocation approach (whereas std::vector uses the block allocation approach) you have to be careful with the pointers and memory management routines. The issues you have got are related to how you work with pointers: in T* ptr; and T& operator[], including the array copy routine. In your example, you are working with a pointer-to-pointer to char - char** (substitute the template with char*). If you are decided to design your own vector implementation with the node allocation approach, I would suggest to also implement the struct VectorTraits and design your vector class using it, at least. Also I would suggest to use std::string instead of char*.

share|improve this answer

In the line:

Vector<char*> vCHAR2(vCHAR);

vCHAR2[2] is a pointer to the string "liability". The line

vCHAR[2] = "expense";

does not change the value of vCHAR2[2] because vCHAR2[2] is still pointing to "liability" even if vCHAR[2] has changed.

To change it you just have to assign to it directly ie

vCHAR2[2] = "expense";

I think what you are trying to achieve is something along the lines of:

int* p = new int();
*p = 111;

int* q = p;

*p = 222; // change the content of what is pointed to

cout << *p << endl; // 222
cout << *q << endl; // 222 also

However, this is a different case since we are changing the contents of what is pointed to. If we just do pointer assignment, the contents are unchanged. Only the pointer is assigned to another area of memory.

*p = 111;

int* q = p;

int z = 333;
p = &z; // do not change the content of what is pointed to, point to another area

cout << *p << endl; // 333
cout << *q << endl; // 222 still
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot for your explanation. It also made my mind more clear. –  developer Jul 6 '12 at 11:17

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