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i am creating a simple server that does nothing but to give an existing file /home/john/www at port 2222. my www folder has three files: index.html, server.c, client.c.

running the server, my firefox can now request for a page thru:

localhost:2222/server.c

the problem is, instead of showing the contents of server.c on my firefox, the file is downloaded instead. (firefox prompts to view or save the file.) same as with index.html and client.c.

i was able to show the contents of server.c days ago on my browser. but i can no longer remember what changes i made to make the browser behave like that.

here's the code snippet where i am doing my modification:

#define LINE_LEN 128
#define MAX_LEN 1024
...
int process_request(int fd, char *www_path) {
    char cmessage[MAX_LEN];
    char *r;
    int n, read_size;
    FILE *file;
    char line[LINE_LEN];
    struct stat sb;
    if((n = read(fd, cmessage, MAX_LEN)) <= 0) {
        return 6;
    }
    cmessage[n] = '\0';
    // assume GET method
    r = cmessage + 4;
    n = 0;
    while(r[n] != ' ') {
        n++;
    }
    int len = strlen(www_path);
    char req_file[len+n+1];
    char temp[n+1];
    strncpy(temp, r, n);
    temp[n] = '\0';
    sprintf(req_file, "%s%s", www_path, temp);
    if(stat(req_file, &sb) == -1) {
        perror("stat");
        return 7;
    }
    char size[10];
    sprintf(size, "%d", sb.st_size);
    file = fopen(req_file, "rb");
    write(fd, "HTTP/1.1 200 OK\r\nContent-length: ", 33);
    write(fd, size, strlen(size));
    write(fd, "\r\n\r\n", 4);
    while((read_size = fread(line, sizeof(char), LINE_LEN, file)) != 0) {
        write(fd, line, read_size);
    }
    fclose(file);
    return 0;
}

or is this just a configuration that can be set in my web browser's setting?

more details:

The socket was created using

socket(AF_INET, SOCK_STREAM, 0);

listen(), bind(), and accept() are successful. select() statement is used to wait for file descriptors that are ready for reading. The file descriptors of clients connected are not closed until the read() to a certain file descriptor returns -1.

Thank you for taking the time to read this. :-) Hoping for a helpful answer to why this is happening.

share|improve this question
1  
@tbert: Why so negative? This is a great way of learning how to use sockets. You don't need to implement the entire HTTP/1.1 protocol to do it. –  Pedro Jul 6 '12 at 9:48
    
@Pedro then the OP shouldn't be surprised, or at a loss to explain, when attempting an operation he explicitly hasn't supported. –  tbert Jul 6 '12 at 11:00
    
@tbert: And in what way was your comment constructive, e.g. how did you point him in the right direction? –  Pedro Jul 6 '12 at 11:47
    
@Pedro I would hope in the future that well-directed criticism of the OP's problem-solving skills would push him to polish them up in the near future. –  tbert Jul 6 '12 at 12:26

2 Answers 2

You need to give the browser a proper content type as part of your server's response. This might be something you either hardcode, or perhaps derive from the file name. For instance:

Content-Type: text/plain
share|improve this answer
    
my very first version only has –  user1506104 Jul 6 '12 at 8:54
    
Thank you unwind. i will try to include this in my header. though, it makes me wonder why it worked days ago without specifying the content type. any idea? again, thank you. –  user1506104 Jul 6 '12 at 9:00

You should set the Content Type header that would specify the MIME Type of the content being sent. Browsers treat the content by type of the content.

If browser is unable to identify the content type it would ask user to save the file.

write(fd, "\r\nContent-Type: text/html");

MIME type would depend upon the content you are sending, for index.html it should be text/html, for .c files it can be text/plain

Apart from this I feel following things are missing from the code logic:

  • how is Content-Length derived
  • as per HTTP protocol, the content starts after headers. To mark the end of headers and start of content, you should have 2 new line entries - that is blank line between content and headers
share|improve this answer
    
Why text/html? text/plain seems much more appropriate... –  glglgl Jul 6 '12 at 9:48

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