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I have written the following code in C#.NET

public interface IWork
{
    void func();

}
public abstract  class WorkClass
{
    public void func()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Calling Abstract Class Function");
    }

}

public class MyClass:WorkClass,IWork
{

}

On compiling, I didn't get any error. Compiler is not forcing me to implement the method "func();" in "MyClass", which has been derived from the interface "IWork".Latter, I can gracefully create a instance of the class "MyClass" and call the function "func()". Why the compiler is not forcing me to implement the "func()" method in the "MyClass"(which has been derived from "IWork" interface? Is it a flaw in C#?

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Because the class MyClass inherits this functions from the abstract class WorkClass- therefore it is implemented. –  Matten Jul 6 '12 at 8:55
    
If you want to be forced, lose it in your base class or lose it in your interface and mark it abstract in your base class. –  Silvermind Jul 6 '12 at 9:01
    
Just a side note: There's no such thing as "multiple inheritance" in C#. You can only inherit from 1 class but implement many interfaces. –  Filip Ekberg Jul 6 '12 at 9:03
1  
This is actually not even a bad question. I had a long time until I fully understood the idea behind interfaces...interfaces are actually only needed if there is no multiple inheritance. Otherwise you just create abstract classes as (implemented) interfaces and inherite those. This is the programmer's paradise. ;) –  Marcus Feb 22 '13 at 21:02

5 Answers 5

Because the abstract class implements the interface.

If your class MyClass would not inherit from WorkClass you would get an error saying 'MyClass' does not implement interface member 'IWork.func()'.

But you also inherit from WorkClass, which actually implements the methods that the interface requires.

You can mark func() as abstract if you want to force the classes that inherits from it to implement it like this:

public abstract class WorkClass
{
    public abstract void func();

}
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To better understand the concept behind interfaces, I just give you the correct code of your implementation:

public interface IWork{
    void func();
}

public abstract class WorkClass,IWork{
    public void func(){
        Console.WriteLine("Calling Abstract Class Function");
    }
}

public class MyClass:WorkClass{
...
}

The basic rule: You need to include the interface always where the implementation is. So if you create a method within an abstract classes and define an interface of this method, you'll need to implement the interface into your abstract class and then all subclasses will automatically implement this interface.

As a matter of fact, interfaces have 2 kind of functions you can use them for:

1) As a "real" interface providing a generic handling of any class implementing the interface, so you can handle several kind of classes just by one interface (without knowing their real class names). While "handling" means: Calling a method.

2) As a help for other (framework) programmers not to mess up with your code. If you want to be sure that an method won't be replaced with another name, you define an interface for your class containing all "must have" method names. Even if the method is called nowhere, your programmer will get an compile error message when he changed the method name.

Now you can easily handle your Myclass just by the interface IWork.

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func() is not marked as abstract in the WorkClass so you don't need to implement it in any classes that derive from WorkClass.

WorkClass implements the IWork interface so you don't need to implement it in MyClass because it inherits func() from WorkClass.

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Since the func method in the abstract class is a non-virtual method, so the compiler thinks this method is a implementation of the interface.

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When you extend MyClass to WorkClass, the method func() (which has been defined), is inherited.

So, when the interface IWork is implemented, the method 'func()' has already been defined. So, there are no more undefined methods in MyClass.

So, the class MyClass is a concrete class, due to which you are able to create a MyClass object without any compilation errors.

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