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I get an error, a red line below the variable intAge in the if-statement in the code. It says the variable is local, but how could it be local when it is declared in the beginning of the code? Does it have to do with the Try/Catch part? The reason why my code looks like it does, is just beacuse I have to use a Try/Catch in the code for this task. Preciate some suggestions to solve this in a similiar and correct way? Thanks!

int intAge;

        try
        {
            intAge = int.Parse(age);
        }
        catch (Exception)
        {
            MessageBox.Show("Enter an age in numbers!","Error!");
        }
        finally
        {

        }
        // Check input
        if (intAge < 1)
        {
            inputOk = false;
            errorMessage = "Please enter 1 or higher!";
        }
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3  
This time it's pretty easy to know that your error message is telling you that intAge is uninitialized, but next time include the actual error message you get. When your code examples become longer and more complicated, including the error message helps people identify the problem quicker. –  Robert Rouhani Jul 6 '12 at 9:03
1  
Make a habit of using TryParse API's. –  zenwalker Jul 6 '12 at 9:09
    
"Local variable" only means a variable that is declared ("defined") inside your method. So it's local to that method. The opposite would be a field which is a variable defined on the class level. There's also a parameter which is a variable declared in the signature of your method. But all this is not related to the compile-time error you had. –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Jul 6 '12 at 9:13
    
I prefer to use TryParse, but I used just int.Parse to be able to find a place to use Try/Catch. This was a requirement from the teacher –  3D-kreativ Jul 6 '12 at 9:14
1  
Also, don't catch the Exception type, look for known exceptions that int.Parse(String) can raise and handle just those instead. –  DaveShaw Jul 6 '12 at 16:40

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

just initialize the intAge:

int intAge = 0;

You are getting error use of unassigned local variable.

Since you are assigning the value in the try block, the compiler can't determine if the assignment will take place or not (in case if int.Parse(age) throws an exception), and then in your check if(intAge<1) you are getting the error because you are using a variable not previously assigned.

Definite assignment - MSDN

At a given location in the executable code of a function member, a variable is said to be definitely assigned if the compiler can prove, by static flow analysis, that the variable has been automatically initialized or has been the target of at least one assignment.

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Thanks for the help! –  3D-kreativ Jul 6 '12 at 9:15
    
@3D-kreativ, you are welcome –  Habib Jul 6 '12 at 9:16

If int.Parse fails, the intAge variable will not be initialized. You may initialize it at delecration

int intAge = 0;

You may avoid the double error :

    int intAge;

    if (!int.TryParse(age, out intAge))
    {
        inputOk = false;  
        errorMessage = "Enter an age in numbers!";  
    }
    else
    {
        // Check input  
        if (intAge < 1)  
        {  
            inputOk = false;  
            errorMessage = "Please enter 1 or higher!";  
        }
    }
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It's local because it's declared in the local scope. Your code may be better structured like:

int intAge;

if (!int.TryParse(age, out intAge))
{
    MessageBox.Show(...
}
else
{
    if (intAge < 1)
        {
            inputOk = false;
            errorMessage = "Please enter 1 or higher!";
        }
}

With your code above you will display two errors, one for non-numeric, and then one for less than 1. The initial complaint of the compiler was because your integer was not guaranteed to be initialised.

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@Saeed: conflicting edits? –  Vlad Jul 6 '12 at 9:03
    
Hmm yes, you offered a better practice (than what OP tried before), but intAge is not in local scope, other answers are correct (related to this question), still your answer works well. –  Saeed Amiri Jul 6 '12 at 9:05
    
It is definitely in local scope, it just wasn't guaranteed to be initialised. Unless I'm missing a point in the code example in the OP, it's all the same scope. –  Paddy Jul 6 '12 at 9:31

The compiler complains that the local variable intAge might not have been initialized when used for the first time. This may happen when int.Parse(age) throws an exception. To correct this, just initialize intAge to some proper value.

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The problem is age is not initialized initialize it to 0 , and try . it must work

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