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I have script that gets some data using DBI's fetchall_hashref().

Usually it returns a hash ref like the following:

{ 1 => { id => 1 } }

However, I'm only interested in the value of the first item in the hash, which is the max value of a particular column. I know Perl hashes are not ordered, but luckily this particular query always return exactly 1 or 0 records (since this is a MAX() query).

But the code currently used to achieved that is really ugly:

$results->{(keys %{$results})[0]}->{'id'};

Is there a more elegant way to active this? (Without resorting to CPAN modules)

Clarification

I'm getting the hash from a data access layer that we use in house. Everything gets returned via fetchall_hashref(). I don't call the fetchall_hashref() itself, it's just how the data access functions are implemented internally, so I'm told. I'm a consumer of that returned data and it happens to be in the form of a hash. I'm looking for a more concise way, if it exists, to access the results of single return value queries

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up vote 6 down vote accepted

You can dereference the id key of the first value in %$results:

(values %$results)[0]->{id};

Normally, this would not be well defined since the ordering of values returned keys or values can be different even between runs on the same machine using the same perl, but since you said %$results can only ever contain one or zero elements, this is a valid method.

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Can be extended to get the second first value as well: (values %{(values %$results)[0]})[0] – fork0 Jul 6 '12 at 9:46
1  
(values %$results)[0]->{id}; is perfect. It expresses clearly that you are not interested in the entire %$results, only its values. No need to try to add more value to it. – Sinan Ünür Jul 6 '12 at 11:09
1  
@fork0 you use values for this task and have taken a 2nd place :D but in readability this is 1st. – gaussblurinc Jul 6 '12 at 12:25
    
Agree, this method states the intention of the code clearly. – GeneQ Jul 6 '12 at 14:14
    
I tried (values %$results)[0]{id}; Seems to work. Shaves off two characters. – GeneQ Jul 6 '12 at 14:31

Instead of fetchall_hashref if you're only getting 0/1 rows back why not do a selectrow_array or selectrow_hashref?

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I'm getting this from a data access layer that we use in house. Everything gets returned via fetchall_hashref(). I don't call the fetchall_hashref() itself, it's just how the data access functions are implemented internally, so I'm told. I'm a consumer of that returned data that happens to be in that format. I'm looking for a more concise way, if it exists, to access the results of single return value queries. – GeneQ Jul 6 '12 at 9:55
1  
Ah - could you update the question to state that using fetchall_hashref is the only way in which you have access to the data please – beresfordt Jul 6 '12 at 10:05

Why are you using fetchall_hashref to fetch a single value? This is better done using selectrow_array:

my ($max) = $dbh->selectrow_array($sql);

Update: if you can't use another DBI method, a more concise way would be:

my $val = [%$results]->[1]{id};
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some kind of beauty – gaussblurinc Jul 6 '12 at 11:36
    
Can someone explain the second expression, please? It is, as @loldop said, something beautiful, but what the heck is [%$results]? – fork0 Jul 6 '12 at 12:08
    
I think I get it: a hash, if converted to a list, is represented by key and value pair, whereof only the value is taken by its index in the list. The value produced by that operation, being a symbolic reference to another hash, can be used to access the hash' values by simple {id} operator (Perl magic) – fork0 Jul 6 '12 at 12:18
    
So, while my solution might be "perfect" (@sinan-unur), I personally will remember this one with a passion :) – fork0 Jul 6 '12 at 12:19
    
@fork0: it's a reference to an array containing key/value pairs of %$results From perldata: hashes included as parts of other lists (...) always flatten out into key/value pairs. – eugene y Jul 6 '12 at 12:21

Does your data access layer always return a hash with sequential keys? If so, then what about

$results->{1}{id}

(Of course, it may not... but your example data used the key 1 for the first record, so it's possible that the data access layer may use deterministic keys.)

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my @keys = sort { $a <=> $b } keys %$results;
my $first = $keys[0];
$results->{$first}->{id};

or if $first = 1;

$results->{1}->{id};
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