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I am getting some very surprising results that seem to indicate that it's more efficient to wrap an iterator in list and get it's length compared to walking it with a lambda. How is this possible? Intuition would suggest that allocating all these lists would be slower.

And yes - I am aware that you can't always do this as iterators can be infinite. :)

from itertools import groupby
from timeit import Timer

data = "abbbccacabbbccacabbbccacabbbccacabbbccacabbbccacabbbccacabbbccacabbbccacabbbccacabbbccacabbbccacabbbccacabbbccacabbbccacabbbccac" 

def rle_walk(gen):
    ilen = lambda gen : sum(1 for x in gen)
    return [(ch, ilen(ich)) for ch,ich in groupby(data)]

def rle_list(data):
    return [(k, len(list(g))) for k,g in groupby(data)]

# randomy data
t = Timer('rle_walk("abbbccacabbbccacabbbccacabbbccacabbbccacabbbccacabbbccacabbbccacabbbccacabbbccacabbbccacabbbccacabbbccacabbbccacabbbccacabbbccac")', "from __main__ import rle_walk; gc.enable()")
print t.timeit(1000)

t = Timer('rle_list("abbbccacabbbccacabbbccacabbbccacabbbccacabbbccacabbbccacabbbccacabbbccacabbbccacabbbccacabbbccacabbbccacabbbccacabbbccacabbbccac")', "from __main__ import rle_list; gc.enable()")
print t.timeit(1000)

# chunky blocks
t = Timer('rle_walk("aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaabbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccc")', "from __main__ import rle_walk; gc.enable()")
print t.timeit(1000)

t = Timer('rle_list("aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaabbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccc")', "from __main__ import rle_list; gc.enable()")
print t.timeit(1000)

1.42423391342
0.145968914032
1.41816806793
0.0165541172028
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1  
Why is that surprising? Function calls in Python are slow. len() is just a call to highly optimized C code. –  vartec Jul 6 '12 at 9:35
    
because you need to load the whole list into the memory before you can call len() –  Maria Zverina Jul 6 '12 at 9:37
    
@MariaZverina Not a real answer but dealing with small amounts of memory like this example would be easily handled by any computer extremely quickly while the lambda involves more function calls as vartec stated. If the data was much larger the timings would be what you expected. –  jamylak Jul 6 '12 at 9:39
2  
@vartec: No, g is an iterator –  Aaron Digulla Jul 6 '12 at 9:40
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3 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Unfortunately your rle_walk has a bug; it takes parameter gen but should take parameter data, so it's operating on the wrong input. Also, it's unfair to make rle_walk use a lambda where rle_list works inline. Rewriting like so:

def rle_walk(data):
    return [(k, sum(1 for _ in g)) for k, g in groupby(data)]

def rle_list(data):
    return [(k, len(list(g))) for k, g in groupby(data)]

and testing:

data_block = "aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaabbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccc"
data_random = "abbbccacabbbccacabbbccacabbbccacabbbccacabbbccacabbbccacabbbccacabbbccacabbbccacabbbccacabbbccacabbbccacabbbccacabbbccacabbbccac"
print [[Timer('r("{data}")'.format(data=data),
              "from __main__ import {r} as r; gc.enable()".format(r=r)).timeit(1000)
        for r in ['rle_walk', 'rle_list']]
        for data in (data_block, data_random)]

gives

[[0.02709507942199707, 0.022060155868530273],
 [0.12022995948791504, 0.16360306739807129]]

so we see that walk is slightly slower than list on the blocky data, but slightly faster on the random data. I'd guess the reason is that generators (in Python) impose an overhead compared to the list constructor; and the memory overhead of a 30-item list is too small to impose any significant penalty.

Disassembling the functions provides a little insight:

>>> dis.dis(lambda g: (1 for _ in g))
  1           0 LOAD_CONST               0 (<code object <genexpr> at 0x2b9202a6fe40, file "<stdin>", line 1>)
              3 MAKE_FUNCTION            0
              6 LOAD_FAST                0 (g)
              9 GET_ITER            
             10 CALL_FUNCTION            1
             13 RETURN_VALUE        
>>> dis.dis((lambda g: (1 for _ in g)).func_code.co_consts[0])
  1           0 SETUP_LOOP              18 (to 21)
              3 LOAD_FAST                0 (.0)
        >>    6 FOR_ITER                11 (to 20)
              9 STORE_FAST               1 (_)
             12 LOAD_CONST               0 (1)
             15 YIELD_VALUE         
             16 POP_TOP             
             17 JUMP_ABSOLUTE            6
        >>   20 POP_BLOCK           
        >>   21 LOAD_CONST               1 (None)
             24 RETURN_VALUE        
>>> dis.dis(lambda g: len(list(g)))
  1           0 LOAD_GLOBAL              0 (len)
              3 LOAD_GLOBAL              1 (list)
              6 LOAD_FAST                0 (g)
              9 CALL_FUNCTION            1
             12 CALL_FUNCTION            1
             15 RETURN_VALUE        

The much larger code volume for the generator form is going to have some effect; while the list form has an O(log n) factor for constructing the throwaway list it's going to be dominated by the k*O(n) factors in looping the various iterators. One thing to take away from this is that memory allocation is fast, at least for small (sub-page) allocations in a single-threaded environment (which CPython is by necessity of the GIL).

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When I rewrite rle_walk as

def rle_walk(gen):
    return [(ch, sum(1 for _ in ich)) for ch, ich in groupby(gen)]

then it's faster than the list-based version.

Timings (with IPython):

>>> def rle_walk(gen):
...     ilen = lambda gen : sum(1 for x in gen)
...     return [(ch, ilen(ich)) for ch,ich in groupby(gen)]
... 
>>> %timeit rle_walk(data)
10000 loops, best of 3: 94.3 us per loop
>>> def ilen(x): return sum(1 for _ in x)
... 
>>> def rle_walk(gen):
...     return [(ch, ilen(ich)) for ch,ich in groupby(gen)]
... 
>>> %timeit rle_walk(data)
10000 loops, best of 3: 93.4 us per loop
>>> def rle_walk(gen):
...     return [(ch, sum(1 for _ in ich)) for ch,ich in groupby(gen)]
... 
>>> %timeit rle_walk(data)
10000 loops, best of 3: 83.8 us per loop
>>> def rle_list(data):
...     return [(k, len(list(g))) for k,g in groupby(data)]
... 
>>> %timeit rle_list(data)
10000 loops, best of 3: 123 us per loop

(Note that you were feeding data instead of gen to groupby in rle_walk.)

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Function call overhead in Python (as in most dynamic languages) is very high.

From Python Performance Tips:

Function call overhead in Python is relatively high, especially compared with the execution speed of a builtin function. This strongly suggests that where appropriate, functions should handle data aggregates.

In the iterator version you have function call to ilen(), and then using Python iteration to build list of 1s.

In the list version you have two calls to built-ins, list() and len(). Built-ins are executed as native code, compiled from highly optimized C. Most importantly iteration for converting iterator to list using list() built-in is done internally, using this native code.

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