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I have no idea why this dosent work

#include <iostream>
#include <pthread.h>
using namespace std;

void *print_message(){

    cout << "Threading\n";
}



int main() {

    pthread_t t1;

    pthread_create(&t1, NULL, &print_message, NULL);
    cout << "Hello";

    return 0;
}

Error:

[Description, Resource, Path, Location, Type] initializing argument 3 of 'int pthread_create(pthread_t*, const pthread_attr_t*, void* (*)(void*), void*)' threading.cpp threading/src line 24 C/C++ Problem

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6 Answers 6

up vote 21 down vote accepted

You should declare the thread main as:

void* print_message(void*) // takes one parameter, unnamed if you aren't using it
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Thats the idea i don't want to put that as a parameter...the above way works –  Angel.King.47 Jul 16 '09 at 7:41
2  
This is the correct answer. The original question was misformatted, so he got the error message wrong (missing a couple of asterisks, which were taken as italic markup). I've fixed it now. –  Pavel Minaev Jul 16 '09 at 7:42
2  
It doesn't matter what you want, pthread_create takes a pointer to a function that takes void* as a parameter and returns void*. It's been the defined API for decade(s). :) You aren't forced to use it though. –  Sam Harwell Jul 16 '09 at 7:43
    
ok but now lets say if i want to use the print_message as a function rather than thread how do i do that.. Its going to complain about the pointer –  Angel.King.47 Jul 16 '09 at 7:53
    
the answer to ^ == print_message(NULL) –  Angel.King.47 Jul 16 '09 at 7:54

Because the main thread exits.

Put a sleep in the main thread.

cout << "Hello";
sleep(1);

return 0;

The POSIX standard does not specify what happens when the main thread exits.
But in most implementations this will cause all spawned threads to die.

So in the main thread you should wait for the thread to die before you exit. In this case the simplest solution is just to sleep and give the other thread a chance to execute. In real code you would use pthread_join();

#include <iostream>
#include <pthread.h>
using namespace std;

#if defined(__cplusplus)
extern "C"
#endif
void *print_message(void*)
{
    cout << "Threading\n";
}



int main() 
{
    pthread_t t1;

    pthread_create(&t1, NULL, &print_message, NULL);
    cout << "Hello";

    void* result;
    pthread_join(t1,&result);

    return 0;
}
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1  
nope cause i have pthread_join(t1) at the end before return 0. Plus its giving me build errors and not runtime errors :( –  Angel.King.47 Jul 16 '09 at 7:39
    
well not really... cause the print_message takes an argument.. Dont want it to take an argument –  Angel.King.47 Jul 16 '09 at 7:46
1  
+1 FLAME WAR! ah ha! –  beggs Jul 16 '09 at 7:53
2  
I had to bump you even though I think you're going to overtake my "lesser" answer lol –  Sam Harwell Jul 16 '09 at 7:57
1  
@Shahmir: But the first example on this page shows how to create a pthread and associated function correctly. From that you can call any other function. –  Loki Astari Jul 16 '09 at 8:00

From the pthread function prototype:

int pthread_create(pthread_t *thread, const pthread_attr_t *attr,
    void *(*start_routine)(void*), void *arg);

The function passed to pthread_create must have a prototype of

void* name(void *arg)
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Loki's answer already states this (9min earlier) –  Mark Essel Aug 1 '12 at 16:59

This worked for me:

#include <iostream>
#include <pthread.h>
using namespace std;

void* print_message(void*) {

    cout << "Threading\n";
}

int main() {

    pthread_t t1;

    pthread_create(&t1, NULL, &print_message, NULL);
    cout << "Hello";

    // Optional.
    void* result;
    pthread_join(t1,&result);
    // :~

    return 0;
}
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1  
Did you just copy the answer from Loki? –  data Nov 26 '13 at 18:36

Linkage. Try this:

extern "C" void *print_message() {...

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When compiling with G++, remember to put the -lpthread flag :)

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I think that might be the issue but im using eclipse any ideas where to add it –  Angel.King.47 Jul 16 '09 at 7:42
    
Just noticed ive already done that. :D otherwise it wont compile the pthread funcs –  Angel.King.47 Jul 16 '09 at 7:46

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