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Why can't I do this:

class MyClass{
    public $dir = 'root/'.Util::getDir();

    public function getURL($file){
        $fullUrl = $this->dir . $file;
        return $fullUrl;
    }
}

echo MyClass::getUrl('my.pdf');

Basically, the issue is with the second line. I can't call a static method while declaring a variable in a class.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can't do this because the language doesn't support it.

In the PHP5 object model a method is either static or dynamic. You have to choose. Ditto class properties.

However, there is nothing to stop you using a private class variable and using object overloading by declaring a __get() to call static methods either in class or out of class.. Just do an isset test the private variable and call your static method on the first invocation.

Remember that you can always refer to static properties and methods using the self:: construct.

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I was wondering if I can't use a __construct method to set this variable for the first time, but I don't know if the construct method will run if the class/method is called stataically like: echo MyClass::getUrl('my.pdf'); –  WordPress Developer Jul 6 '12 at 10:51
    
We've just done an update cross. Keep Static and non-static methods and properties separate in your mind and in your programming. If the property or method has a context or a functionality which is specific to object then it can't be static. It has to be of the form $a->property. V.v. if it is invariant across all class objects then it really should be static. –  TerryE Jul 6 '12 at 10:57
1  
@user1364793, __construct() runs when you do a new ClassName() If you want to initialise static properties then create a static method, say setup() and invoke ClassName::setup() as part of your script initialisation –  TerryE Jul 6 '12 at 14:31

You are assigning $dir at compilation you can do this in constructor at the object initialization

class MyClass{
  public $dir;
  public function __construct(){    
     $this->dir = 'root/'.Util::getDir();
    }
}

when you will create the instance of this class $this->dir will be set.

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Yes static methods can be called in constructors –  Rupesh Patel Jul 6 '12 at 10:53
    
But will the constructor be called if I call the MyClass::getURL() statically? –  WordPress Developer Jul 6 '12 at 10:55
1  
ok , i missed the point.you can not use $this in any static method,why dont you do this class MyClass{ public function getURL($file){ $fullUrl = 'root/'.Util::getDir() . $file; return $fullUrl; } } you can not use other static variable and use self. –  Rupesh Patel Jul 7 '12 at 13:49

you will need to define it as:

public static $dir= '/some/path/';

then you can do:

self::$dir;

In the static function.

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Don't you have to do something like

class MyClass{
    public $dir;

    public function setDir(){
        $this->dir = 'root/'.Util::getDir(); 
    }
}
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Unfortunately, I can't do this in my case, because I will call the class MyClass statically as well. The problem is that I can't even define $dir when its value comes from a static method. –  WordPress Developer Jul 6 '12 at 10:38
    
hmmmm I don't think I can help, my brain need's some sleep sorry. –  Oliver Bayes-Shelton Jul 6 '12 at 10:40
    
I've edited my question with a more clear example of the usage. –  WordPress Developer Jul 6 '12 at 10:44

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