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For example,we have pixels. However, pixels are not constant. I would imagine that high resolution android screens will have more pixels.

Then we have density, which doesn't seem to help a lot. It's not as precise as pixels and still not constant. A high resolution will have high numbers of "densities"

Do we have something like 10% of screen size. Is it common among programmers to do so?

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In case you have not read it yet, this tutorial contains a lot of useful information. –  assylias Jul 6 '12 at 10:39
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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Never (or almost never) work with absolute pixels.

If you want to work with percentages of a screen's layout then use layout_weight.

The following condensed XML layout file shows a vertical LinearLayout with two TextView widgets each within their own LinearLayouts. The inner LinearLayouts have their height set to 0dp but the 'sum' of the 'weights' (0.9 + 0.1) equals 1 therefore the first inner LinearLayout gets automatically expanded to 90% of the height of the screen whilst the second gets 10%.

The numbers you use don't matter...they could be 9 & 1 or 90 & 10 or 900 & 100...it comes down to the total sum and what each represents as a percentage. The layout inflation process will do the rest without you needing to know about absolute pixels.

<LinearLayout
    android:orientation="vertical"
    ... >
    <LinearLayout
        ...
        android:layout_height="0dp"
        android:layout_weight="0.9" >
        <Textview
            ... >
    </LinearLayout>
    <LinearLayout
        ...
        android:layout_height="0dp"
        android:layout_weight="0.1" >
        <Textview
            ... >
    </LinearLayout>
</LinearLayout>
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True completely forgot about weights (never use it). That would do the trick :) –  Warpzit Jul 6 '12 at 11:28
    
If you already set out the layout_weight why do you need to set up the layout_height? –  Jim Thio Jul 9 '12 at 13:52
    
@JimThio : Both layout_width and layout_height are required attribtes in an Android layout file. I didn't show layout_width in my example code as it wasn't relevant to the answer. Setting layout_height to be 0dp together with layout_weight forces the layout inflation process to allocate relevant weight percentage based on the sum of weights without the layout_height having any absolute influence. –  Squonk Jul 9 '12 at 17:52
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The answer is no you don't have that. But you could make your own like % of screen. You wouldn't be able to use it in xml but you could set it dynamically from code. Following methodes can be used to get height and width of screen:

public static int getScreenHeight(Context context) {
    DisplayMetrics metrics = context.getResources().getDisplayMetrics();
    return(metrics.heightPixels);
}

public static int getScreenWidth(Context context) {
    DisplayMetrics metrics = context.getResources().getDisplayMetrics();
    return(metrics.widthPixels);
}
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1  
Or just use layout_weight perhaps. –  Squonk Jul 6 '12 at 11:16
    
what is layout_weight? –  Jim Thio Jul 9 '12 at 13:49
    
@JimThio LinearLayout uses weights. He's referring to that. –  Warpzit Jul 9 '12 at 13:53
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As far as I know, there is nothing like that.

But you can implement the same using your own code. Get the width and the height of the display and then do your own manipulations on them before setting the layout parameters.

    Display display = getWindowManager().getDefaultDisplay();
    int width = display.getWidth();
    int height = display.getHeight();
    yourLinearLayout.setLayoutParams(new LinearLayout.LayoutParams(
            (width/2), height/4)); // assuming that you want 50% width n 25% height of the display. 
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2  
Or just use layout_weight perhaps. –  Squonk Jul 6 '12 at 11:16
    
Yeah, that too! –  Swayam Jul 6 '12 at 11:17
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