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I have an ASP.Net application that references a DLL which contains a singleton. The singleton contains only two publically accessible methods and no public properties. The Web App creates an instance of this singleton during Application_Start. This is then available throughout the application lifespan.

The singleton maintains a connection to a 3rd party application, and listens for a number of different events that fire in the third party application. These events are logged and processed within the singleton, as and when they occur.

As users access the web app, their requests make use of a public method on the singleton that, in turn, uses private member data to call a method on the third party application. These calls are within a try...catch block.

Should I lock the public method to maintain thread safety, and if so would a simple private member of type System.Object, that is used only for the purpose of locking, be sufficient?

Here is some 'pseudo code' for the singleton. I hope I have made my question understandable.

using My3rdPartyDLL;

public sealed class MySingleton
{
    private static MySingleton instance = new MySingleton();
    private Object lockObj = new Object();

    private My3rdPartyAPI myAPI = null;


    public static MySingleton Instance
    {
        get{ return instance; }
    }   

    static MySingleton()
    {
    }

    private MySingleton() 
    {
        Initialise(); // Creates third party API and hooks up events.
    }

    // Here is the public method that I want to ensure is
    // thread safe.
    public void SomePublicMethod(String myString)
    {
        lock (lockObj)
        {
            try
            {
                My3rdPartyDLL.MyMethod(myString);
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                // deal with exception
            }
        }
    }

    private void My3rdParty_Event(EventObj obj)
    {
        MyEventLogger.WriteToLog(obj);  
    }
}
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Why do you believe you need to use a Singleton in this instance? If the third party software already has one, it seems sort of pointless, considering each user would have their unique session and thus their own singleton already anyways. –  Ramhound Jul 6 '12 at 11:28
    
@Ramhound: The singleton is application wide. So not one instance/session. Otherwise it would be a context instance, not singleton. –  Marcel N. Jul 6 '12 at 11:29
2  
If you need locking or not depends on whether My3rdPartyDLL.MyMethod is thread-safe or not. Being a singleton leads me to believe it will. But maybe you know more about it and can confirm. –  Marcel N. Jul 6 '12 at 11:31
    
@Ramhound I have no knowledge of the internals of the 3rd party app, but I do need to log its events in one place, hence my singleton in the Web App. I do not want each user creating their own connection to the 3rd party. –  iWeasel Jul 6 '12 at 11:44
    
@thecoon A good point, but knowledge of whether the 3rd party is thread safe is not available to me. So, I created the singleton to maintain a single point of cohesion between my Web App and the API. I guess then if I cannot be sure 3rd Party API is thread safe, I should be defensive and deal with it in my own code. Perhaps I have just answered my own question... if this is the case, is using the lockObj a good method to deal with this? –  iWeasel Jul 6 '12 at 11:50

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

A good point, but knowledge of whether the 3rd party is thread safe is not available to me. So, I created the singleton to maintain a single point of cohesion between my Web App and the API. I guess then if I cannot be sure 3rd Party API is thread safe, I should be defensive and deal with it in my own code. Perhaps I have just answered my own question... if this is the case, is using the lockObj a good method to deal with this?

Given the fact that you cannot be sure if the external method is thread safe, it is better to synchronize calls to it.

You can lock on a static lockObj, but watch out for performance. If you are serving a large number of requests/sec then you'll run into problems (requests waiting for other requests to release the monitor), if the method is called at every requests or a close rate to once/request (or more).

Since you're locking a single method, you should be fine with lock. So no real use here for ManualResetEvent, Monitor and alternatives.

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I put some general statements in my question about client requests, when the reality is that the singleton public methods are called only on very specific web app events. It is also an internal application for a company of 35 users, so I'll probably max out at 1 request per n minutes. On this basis I am going to stick with the lockOBj, for those rare times two or three users are doing the same thing. Thanks for the help. I will be learning about Monitor and ManualResetEvent for the future, though. –  iWeasel Jul 6 '12 at 14:40

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