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I have to insert 8000+ records into a SQLite database using Django's ORM. This operation needs to be run as a cronjob about once per minute.
At the moment I'm using a for loop to iterate through all the items and then insert them one by one.
Example:

for item in items:
    entry = Entry(a1=item.a1, a2=item.a2)
    entry.save()

What is an efficent way of doing this?


Edit: A little comparison between the two insertion methods.

Without commit_manually decorator (11245 records):

nox@noxdevel marinetraffic]$ time python manage.py insrec             

real    1m50.288s
user    0m6.710s
sys     0m23.445s

Using commit_manually decorator (11245 records):

[nox@noxdevel marinetraffic]$ time python manage.py insrec                

real    0m18.464s
user    0m5.433s
sys     0m10.163s

Note: The test script also does some other operations besides inserting into the database (downloads a ZIP file, extracts an XML file from the ZIP archive, parses the XML file) so the time needed for execution does not necessarily represent the time needed to insert the records.

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8 Answers 8

up vote 60 down vote accepted

You want to check out django.db.transaction.commit_manually.

http://docs.djangoproject.com/en/dev/topics/db/transactions/#django-db-transaction-commit-manually

So it would be something like:

from django.db import transaction

@transaction.commit_manually
def viewfunc(request):
    ...
    for item in items:
        entry = Entry(a1=item.a1, a2=item.a2)
        entry.save()
    transaction.commit()

Which will only commit once, instead at each save().

In django 1.3 context managers were introduced. So now you can use transaction.commit_on_success() in a similar way:

from django.db import transaction

def viewfunc(request):
    ...
    with transaction.commit_on_success():
        for item in items:
            entry = Entry(a1=item.a1, a2=item.a2)
            entry.save()

In django 1.4, bulk_create was added, allowing you to create lists of your model objects and then commit them all at once.

NOTE the save method will not be called when using bulk create.

>>> Entry.objects.bulk_create([
...     Entry(headline="Django 1.0 Released"),
...     Entry(headline="Django 1.1 Announced"),
...     Entry(headline="Breaking: Django is awesome")
... ])

In django 1.6, transaction.atomic was introduced, intended to replace now legacy functions commit_on_success and commit_manually.

from the django documentation on atomic:

atomic is usable both as a decorator:

from django.db import transaction

@transaction.atomic
def viewfunc(request):
    # This code executes inside a transaction.
    do_stuff()

and as a context manager:

from django.db import transaction

def viewfunc(request):
    # This code executes in autocommit mode (Django's default).
    do_stuff()

    with transaction.atomic():
        # This code executes inside a transaction.
        do_more_stuff()
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7  
This will instantiate them all as models, and run thousands of individual inserts. I've always had to drop to SQL and do manual batch inserts for this type of volume; Django isn't built for it. But yes, you definitely want a single transaction if you're doing it this way. –  Glenn Maynard Jul 17 '09 at 0:26
    
I don't know the Django ORM that well, but doesn't the ORM just generate the SQL for you? And in a simple model with no foreign keys, doesn't a single instance translate to a single insert statement? –  monkut Jul 17 '09 at 2:28
    
Hi could you please elaborate the same in terms of .net? It would be a great help , as i am facing the same situation –  Amit Ranjan Jul 29 '10 at 9:51
2  
I don't have .net experience, but speaking from a general Database perspective, turn off AUTOCOMMIT and encapsulating INSERT statements between BEGIN/END TRANSACTION statements will be faster than using AUTOCOMMIT and running INSERTS alone. Note, these commands and how they are used can change based on the DB your using. If you want a .net or .net framework specific answer go ahead and start a new question. –  monkut Jul 30 '10 at 1:56
3  
Now that Django 1.4 is out, using docs.djangoproject.com/en/dev/ref/models/querysets/… makes a lot more sense. The other fast alternative is to manually create a batch SQL insert. The tip here (committing in one transaction) will not be nearly as fast as sending in one insert. –  Ben Mar 29 '12 at 20:15

Have a look at this. It's meant for use out-of-the-box with MySQL only, but there are pointers on what to do for other databases.

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You might be better off bulk-loading the items - prepare a file and use a bulk load tool. This will be vastly more efficient than 8000 individual inserts.

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You should check out DSE. I wrote DSE to solve these kinds of problems ( massive insert or updates ). Using the django orm is a dead-end, you got to do it in plain SQL and DSE takes care of much of that for you.

Thomas

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1  
Another thing; If you decide to use plain SQL and if the SQL you`re inserting has the same fields each time, try using cursor.executemany(SQL, [list of entries to insert]). Much faster than running an insert per entry. –  Weholt Feb 5 '11 at 1:26

I recommend using plain SQL (not ORM) you can insert multiple rows with a single insert:

insert into A select from B;

The select from B portion of your sql could be as complicated as you want it to get as long as the results match the columns in table A and there are no constraint conflicts.

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To answer the question particularly with regard to SQLite, as asked, while I have just now confirmed that bulk_create does provide a tremendous speedup there is a limitation with SQLite: "The default is to create all objects in one batch, except for SQLite where the default is such that at maximum 999 variables per query is used."

The quoted stuff is from the docs--- A-IV provided a link.

What I have to add is that this djangosnippets entry by alpar also seems to be working for me. It's a little wrapper that breaks the big batch that you want to process into smaller batches, managing the 999 variables limit.

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I've ran into the same problem and I can't figure out a way to do it without so many inserts. I agree that using transactions is probably the right way to solve it, but here is my hack:

 def viewfunc(request):
     ...
     to_save = [];
     for item in items:
         entry = Entry(a1=item.a1, a2=item.a2)
         to_save.append(entry);
     map(lambda x: x.save(), to_save);
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2  
This is actually no different than doing the save() call within the for loop. Basically you now loop a second time to do all the save() calls. But Django will still do the same amount of insert queries. The only optimisation is the one @monkut describes using transaction.commit_manually. –  Remco Wendt Mar 13 '11 at 11:17

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