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There is a lot of shapes that we can make with pure CSS, like in http://nicolasgallagher.com/pure-css-gui-icons/demo/ and you always write one element (here <li>).

But if we want shapes that are a little bit more complexe, like http://www.gentegeek.com/proyectos/html-css-space-invaders/ we must put a lot of <div> (see the source code).

Can I make shapes with only one element? If yes, how?

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Can I make shapes with only one element?No.now no how arises. –  user1432124 Jul 6 '12 at 11:39
    
@Random Okay, but maybe someone else found a way and will share it with us. –  Mageek Jul 6 '12 at 11:41
1  
ok check to this i have careated all shape pick one as like you tinkerbin.com/glfu6QQK –  Rohit Azad Jul 6 '12 at 11:42
    
By default the shape of element in HTML is rectangular. So using only one elemt for creating different shapes I dont think it can be done. There is one way to create shapes using one element, by using direct image tag :( –  Narendra Jul 6 '12 at 11:43
1  
You can only have one :before and one :after per element. I reckon you'd need seven elements to be able to create your example. –  thirtydot Jul 6 '12 at 11:45
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1 Answer

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Yes! -- With CSS3

However, it is probably not worth the effort in most cases. Essentially, given enough forethought and patience, you can "paint" practically any pixel based shape (like your example) using linear-gradient.

Here is a fiddle. (Updated to allow for transparency of image areas itself).

The code is a single div element (per your request). The css is as follows (I've not posted all the vendor prefix equivalents here).

div {
    width: 240px;
    height: 160px;
    background-repeat: no-repeat;
    background-position: 0 0, 0 20px, 0 40px, 0 70px, 0 90px, 0 100px, 0 120px, 0 140px;
    background-size: 240px 20px, 240px 20px, 240px 30px, 240px 20px, 240px 10px, 240px 20px, 240px 20px, 240px 20px;
    background-image:
        linear-gradient(left, transparent 0px, transparent 40px, #000 41px, #000 60px, transparent 61px, transparent 180px, #000 181px, #000 200px, transparent 201px, transparent 240px ),
        linear-gradient(left, #000 0px, #000 20px, transparent 21px, transparent 60px, #000 61px, #000 80px, transparent 81px, transparent 160px, #000 161px, #000 180px, transparent 181px, transparent 220px, #000 221px, #000 240px),
        linear-gradient(left, #000 0px, #000 20px, transparent 21px, transparent 40px, #000 41px, #000 200px, transparent 201px, transparent 220px, #000 221px, #000 240px),
        linear-gradient(left, #000 0px, #000 60px, transparent 61px, transparent 80px, #000 81px, #000 160px, transparent 161px, transparent 180px, #000 181px, #000 240px),
        linear-gradient(left, #000, #000),
        linear-gradient(left, transparent 0px, transparent 20px, #000 21px, #000 220px, transparent 221px, transparent 240px ),
        linear-gradient(left, transparent 0px, transparent 40px, #000 41px, #000 60px, transparent 61px, transparent 180px, #000 181px, #000 200px, transparent 201px, transparent 240px ),
        linear-gradient(left, transparent 0px, transparent 20px, #000 21px, #000 40px, transparent 41px, transparent 200px, #000 201px, #000 220px, transparent 221px, transparent 240px );
}
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Is there a way to have transparency ? –  Mageek Jul 6 '12 at 22:14
2  
@Mageek--Sure, change the #000 to an rgba() color scheme with the alpha transparency and it should work in CSS3 browsers also. See this fiddle. –  ScottS Jul 6 '12 at 22:30
    
Thanks a lot :) –  Mageek Jul 6 '12 at 22:43
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